Courses for Exchange Students

Taught courses

Courses of the academic year 2021/2022

Please note, it is subject to change. For detailed information on designing your LA, you may consult How to choose courses section.



YBAJ077 A History of Quantification: Problems and Perspectives in Central Europe (Spring)
YMHA46 A History of Quantification: Problems and Perspectives in Central Europe (Spring)
YBAJ154 A history of the "Third Reich" (1933-1945) II Domination, Occupation and War Economy (Spring)
YBAJ053 A history of the "Third Reich" (1933-1945). Domination, Society and Mass Murder (Fall)
YMH328 Africa from the Historical-Sociological perspective (Fall)
YBAJ083 Animation Design with Moviestorm (Fall)
YBA334 Anthropological methods: fieldwork and ethnography (lecture) (Fall)
YBAJ082 Anthropological methods: fieldwork and ethnography (seminar) (Fall)
YBA247 Anthropological Theory for Everybody (Fall)
YBA326 Anthropology of Ritual (Spring)
YBA246 Body, Health and Society (Spring)
YBAJ165 Bohemian (Contemporary) Art in Global Philosophical Context (Spring)
YBAU08 CEE Economic Growth and Development (Fall)
YBAC007 Central European Film (Fall)
YBH238 Cities in Civilization (Fall + spring)
YMH522 Collective Memory and Its Research (Spring)
YBAU011 Comprehending the Holocaust (Fall)
YBAJ156 Continent of Failed Hope”: Latin America from Cold War to the “Pink Tide” (1953-2006) (Spring)
YBAJ024 Controversial Issues in Anthropology (Spring)
YBAC051 Crisis and Culture in Central European Capitals (Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Berlin), 1848-1939 (Fall)
YBAJ058 Czech (Pre-)Intermediate (Spring)
YBAC008 Czech Art and Architecture: from the Middle Ages to the 21st Century (Fall)
YBAJ057 Czech Language Course for Beginners (Fall)
YBF224 David Hume Seminar (Spring)
YMH540 Design of Quantitative Research II. (Spring)
YMH537 Discourse Analysis (Spring)
YBAU037 Economic History and Long-Run Development (Fall)
YMH505 Economic Systems from a Historical-Sociological Perspective (Spring)
YBA130 Economics and Psychology (Fall)
YBAU005 Economics of Transition (Fall)
YMFPR209 Ernst Cassirer, a bridge between two cultures and between rival philosophical traditions (Fall + spring)
YBAC151 European Economies in Transition (Fall)
YMFPR156 European Philosophy (Fall)
YBAU017 European-American Relations in the 21st Century (Fall)
YMGS625 Feminism and Environmental Movements (Fall + spring)
YMGS614 Feminist Political Theory (Spring)
YMGS629 Feminist Proposals for a Peaceful Future (Fall + spring)
YBAU020 Film as a Mirror of History, Ideology, and Individual Freedom (Fall)
YBAC048 Franz Kafka and Central European Literature (Fall)
YBAC47 From Propaganda to Post-Truth: A History of Fake News (Fall)
YMGS626 Gender and Psychology (Spring)
YMGS601 Gender and Religion (Fall)
YMGS628 Gender, Nature, Culture (Spring)
YMFPR152 German Classical Philosophy (Fall)
YBFC212 German for Philosophers (Fall)
YMFPR171 German for Philosophers (Fall)
YMFPR13 German for Philosophers II. (Spring)
YBAU015 Global Communication (Fall)
YBAJ085 Hippocratic writings (Fall)
YBAJ160 Historical Anthropology of Gift Exchange (Spring)
YMHA44 Historical Anthropology of Gift Exchange (Spring)
YBAJ084 Historical Anthropology of Migration (Fall)
YMHA48 Historical Anthropology of Migration (Fall)
YMH501 Historical Comparative Sociology (Fall)
YMH730 Historical Sociology of Genocide (Spring)
YMH546 Historical Sociology of Global Politics and International Relations (Fall)
YMH503 Historical Sociology of Knowledge, Culture, and Religion (Fall)
YMH511 Historical Sociology of Politics (Spring)
YMN0HHR History of Human Rights in International Relations (Fall + spring)
YMPC005 Hormones and Behavior (Fall)
YBAJ087 Housing Estates, Ideology, and Architecture in Prague (Fall)
YBAU28 Human Rights in Central and Eastern Europe (Fall)
YBAJ019 Humor under the Iron Curtain: Jokes and Everyday Life under Totalitarianism (Fall)
YBAJ078 Chernobyl: A Philosophical Study (Spring)
YMSMK028PV Iconology: Art-historical and Philosophical Aspects Of Reading The Cultural Phenomena (Fall)
YMN201 Identity, culture and cultural misunderstanding in the Czech context (Fall + spring)
YMFPR162 Intercultural Philosophy I. (Fall)
YMFPR163 Intercultural Philosophy II: (Spring)
YBK052 Introduction to 3-D Graphics (Spring)
YMFPR207 Introduction to Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art (Fall)
YBAJ001 Introduction to Anthropology (Fall)
YMH518 Introduction to Civilization Studies - Reading (Fall)
YBAJ011 Introduction to Economics (Fall)
YBF303 Introduction to Christian Symbolism (Spring)
YBAJ014 Introduction to Political Philosophy (Spring)
YBAJ010 Introduction to Psychology (Spring)
YBA276 Introduction to Research Methods in Social Sciences (Spring)
YBAJ009 Introduction to Sociology (Spring)
YBA242 Introduction to the Musics of the World (Spring)
YMFPR206 Introduction to the Philosophy of Music (Fall)
YBAJ076 Introduction to the Politics of Climate Change (Fall)
YBAC045 Jewish Life in Contemporary Europe (Fall)
YBFC213 Language Course: French Literature and Philosophy I. (Fall)
YMFPR170 Language Course: French Literature and Philosophy I. (Fall)
YMFPR15 Language Course: French Philosophy and Literature II. (Spring)
YMFPR151 Methodology and Basic Concepts of Classical Phenomenology (Fall)
YMH504 Methodology of Historical Science (Fall)
YMH549 Milestones of European historical development in historical and sociological context (Fall)
YBAC001 Modern History of the Jews in East Central Europe (Fall)
YBA315 Music and Youth Cultures (Spring)
YBAJ037 Music, Culture, and Technology (Fall)
YMPC006 Neurobiology of Motivation (Fall)
YBAJ048 Oral history perspectives on Cold War 1945-1989 (Fall)
YMFPR190 Phenomenological Anthropology (Spring)
YMFPR208 Phenomenology and Marxism (Fall)
YMFPR154 Philosophical Anthropology (Spring)
YMFPR157 Philosophy of Art (Spring)
YBF348 Plato and Aristotle on Love and Friendship (Spring)
YBAJ159 Plato’s Republic (Fall + spring)
YBAC032 Political and Cultural History of East Central Europe in the 20th Century (Fall)
YMGS616 Postcolonial Studies in Gender Perspective (Spring)
YBAU004 Prague as Living History: Anatomy of a European Capital (Fall)
YBH335 Preparatory Seminar for Introduction to European History (Fall)
YMH539 Procedures and Methods of Historical Research (Spring)
YMH515 Quantitative Data Analysis I. (Spring)
YMGS631 Race and Gender (Fall)
YBAJ086 (Re-)Building the Republic of Letters: Science in the Interwar Period (Fall)
YMH502 Reading in Historical Comparative Sociology (Fall)
YMFPR172 Reading Seminar in Phenomenology I. (Fall)
YMH5033 Science and Scientific Knowledge from the Perspective of Historical Sociology (Fall)
YBAJ073 Seminar in Social Psychology (Fall)
YMH542 Seminar on Modernization and Modernization Processes (Spring)
YMH519 Sociological Data and Data Archives (Fall)
YBAJ054 Sociological Theory (Fall)
YMH541 Sociology of Development and Transformation (Spring)
YBAU026 Surveillance in Central and Eastern Europe: Social Control Methods Before and After Communism (Fall)
YBAJ020 Symbolical Figures of Czech History (Spring)
YMFPR153 20th Century Philosophy (Spring)
YMH509 The Formation of the Nation within the Process of European Modernization (Spring)
YBAJ155 The Habsburg Monarchy 1848-1918. Minorities, Nationalism, and Ethnic politics (Fall + spring)
YMA375 The Power of Cultural Representation (Spring)
YMH513 The Quotidian from the Perspective of Historical Social Sciences (Spring)
YMN140 Theatre of the Oppressed and Educational Activities in Civil Society (Spring)
YMH544 Theory of Social Change (Fall)
YBF349 Towards a Philosophy of Existence (Fall + spring)
YBA337 Travelling in the Middle Ages (Fall)
YBAU018 Urban Anthropology of Central European Cities (Fall)
YBAJ036 Virtues, Vices, and Formation of Society (Fall + spring)
YMH550 Visual methods in historical sociology (Spring)
YBAJ351 Visual Sociology (Spring)
YMFPR205 What is Society? Anthropology, Philosophy, and Sociology (Spring)
YBAC011 World Financial Institutions and Markets (Fall)


A History of Quantification: Problems and Perspectives in Central Europe

Code: YBAJ077 Lecturer: Erdelyi,M.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Our task in this course is to explore the application and diffusion of statistical thinking in Central Europe in the long nineteenth century. Statistical thinking is not merely investigated as an academic discipline, but the course will look at practical uses of statistical methods ranging from the public sphere to the private economy that constantly exploited advances in statistical mathematics and probability theory. It thus plans to reconcile specific forms of statistical knowledge about society and economy with their equally diverse forms of application by natural and social scientists, private and public clerks, and other intellectuals. During the course we will be attentive to the relevance of Central European debates concerning statistics at the backdrop of pioneering ideas in Western states. We will explore how debates inform the local and regional agendas of our protagonists—not only political but epistemological, institutional, and empirical as well. By the same token, the course concentrates on the specific places of knowledge production and its effects on methods and on the way our protagonists pursued credibility and battled for social authority.Online: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3ad8fde565b50d410083024a79f6beca39%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=e4ba9623-f17c-4efd-a6d3-a144d63ff59d&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2

A History of Quantification: Problems and Perspectives in Central Europe

Code: YMHA46 Lecturer: Erdelyi,M.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 5
Our task in this course is to explore the application and diffusion of statistical thinking in Central Europe in the long nineteenth century. Statistical thinking is not merely investigated as an academic discipline, but the course will look at practical uses of statistical methods ranging from the public sphere to the private economy that constantly exploited advances in statistical mathematics and probability theory. It thus plans to reconcile specific forms of statistical knowledge about society and economy with their equally diverse forms of application by natural and social scientists, private and public clerks, and other intellectuals. During the course we will be attentive to the relevance of Central European debates concerning statistics at the backdrop of pioneering ideas in Western states. We will explore how debates inform the local and regional agendas of our protagonists—not only political but epistemological, institutional, and empirical as well. By the same token, the course concentrates on the specific places of knowledge production and its effects on methods and on the way our protagonists pursued credibility and battled for social authority.

A history of the "Third Reich" (1933-1945) II Domination, Occupation and War Economy

Code: YBAJ154 Lecturer: Vondráček,J.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
In this seminar we will analyze three key aspects of the history of Nazi Germany and the Second World War: Nazi domination, occupation and the war economy. We will focus on Nazi military expansion until 1945. In this context we will take closer look at the German war of annihilation (Vernichtungskrieg) and the Holocaust in the east. Although terror and mass murder played a key role in Nazi policy, we will also study how the Nazi policy differed in the east and west towards local populations and how this policy was connected to the war economy. The seminar will be strongly text-based. You will be asked to read one to two texts and answer in-depth questions at each session.The course takes place online.

A history of the "Third Reich" (1933-1945). Domination, Society and Mass Murder

Code: YBAJ053 Lecturer: Vondráček,J.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The history of the “Third Reich” is still an ever expanding field of research with hundreds of books being published every year. However, we will analyze three key aspects of the history of Nazi Germany: domination, society, and mass murder.We will focus on the building of the Nazi state from 1933 until the end of the war. In this context we will take a look at different theories which try to explain the stability of Nazi domination until its military defeat. The Nazi vision of a racial pure and hierarchically organized “Volksgemeinschaft” as a specific form of German society is the second field we will analyze. Various inclusion and exclusion mechanisms will be considered as well as different historical approaches.The Holocaust and the mass murder of gypsy and other ethnic groups as well as the terror against political enemies of the Reich, materialized in the system of Nazi concentration and extermination camps, will be the last field of research we will deal with.The seminar will be strongly text based. You will be asked to read one or two texts and be asked to answer guiding questions for each session.vondracek@mua.cas.cz

Africa from the Historical-Sociological perspective

Code: YMH328 Lecturer: Kumsa,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The aim of this course is to elucidate the development of African society through their long journey of political systems, their various economic sectors, the indigenous African religion, the expansion of Christianity and Islam- the three main influential faiths in the continent. The course is divided into three parts: the first part of the course illustrates the long period of African society’s historical independent development, before the colonial era, the second part explains the short period of colonial overrule of Africa and its consequences and finally the longest part of the course concentrate on post-independent period of contemporary Africa, in which the political, economic, religious movements and various violent conflicts will be discussed.

Animation Design with Moviestorm

Code: YBAJ083 Lecturer: Říha,D.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
This course is designed for those students who have the interest in animation movies. The production process is realized in a software Moviestorm, that allows to produce original animation without prior knowledge of 3D animation softwares.

Anthropological methods: fieldwork and ethnography (lecture)

Code: YBA334 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Ethnography is the art and science of studying and writing about human culture and society. It is one of the most important methods in qualitative research, not only in anthropology, but also in other social science disciplines. It helps scholars and students to effectively approach and address, as well as to gain valuable and in-depth understanding of, relevant social and cultural phenomena. Students learn in this course about the main ethnographic fieldwork methods and techniques (participant-observation, interviewing, grounded theory, coding, eliciting of meaning, textual analysis, Internet ethnography, ethnography of [music] performance). In addition, they also practice how to develop a research design (including research questions, and a thesis statement), as well as how to present, analyze, and interpret ethnographic data in writing (in papers, articles, theses). In regard to the latter, students will master different forms of ethnographic writing for this course (fieldnotes, vignettes, ethnographic description, analysis of data, transcription). Furthermore, class topics also address the issues of positionality, reflexivity, and research ethics. Students are required to submit weekly reading and writing assignments, design and conduct a small fieldwork study, and present it in a final paper. The course also prepares the students for the writing of their BA theses in the field of anthropology and other related disciplines (including ethnomusicology). Advisably for the second year BA students. This class is taught in two interconnected classes (co-requisites: YBA334 and YBA082), and it is mandatory to register for both, in order to successfully complete either of them.

Anthropological methods: fieldwork and ethnography (seminar)

Code: YBAJ082 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
Ethnography is the art and science of studying and writing about human culture and society. It is one of the most important methods in qualitative research, not only in anthropology, but also in other social science disciplines. It helps scholars and students to effectively approach and address, as well as to gain valuable and in-depth understanding of, relevant social and cultural phenomena. Students learn in this course about the main ethnographic fieldwork methods and techniques (participant-observation, interviewing, grounded theory, coding, eliciting of meaning, textual analysis, Internet ethnography, ethnography of [music] performance). In addition, they also practice how to develop a research design (including research questions, and a thesis statement), as well as how to present, analyze, and interpret ethnographic data in writing (in papers, articles, theses). In regard to the latter, students will master different forms of ethnographic writing for this course (fieldnotes, vignettes, ethnographic description, analysis of data, transcription). Furthermore, class topics also address the issues of positionality, reflexivity, and research ethics. Students are required to submit weekly reading and writing assignments, design and conduct a small fieldwork study, and present it in a final paper. The course also prepares the students for the writing of their BA theses in the field of anthropology and other related disciplines (including ethnomusicology). Advisably for the second year BA students. This class is taught in two interconnected classes (co-requisites: YBA334 and YBA082), and it is mandatory to register for both, in order to successfully complete either of them.

Anthropological Theory for Everybody

Code: YBA247 Lecturer: Seidlová,V.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
First, theory can be difficult to grasp, but the aim of this course is to make it accessible because theory helps people understand and transform the world. Anthropology might be said to be characterized by a ‘toss and turn’ dynamic - it has taken a number of intellectual turns. A recent turn, for example, is ontological. It succeeds postmodern reflexive, interpretive, cultural materialist, structural-functional, historical particularist, and unilinear evolutionary turns. These turns reveal vibrant debates among anthropologists and the passion to understand the world. For a detailed preliminary syllabus, see the pdf attachment (the time of the class and the weekly dates change accordingly to the actual schedule of the academic year! Please refer to the actual schedule published in SIS).Important notice for the students of the 1st year of the Liberal Arts and Humanities Programme: THIS COURSE DOES NOT SUBSTITUTE THE COMPULSORY INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY. It is designed mostly for the 2nd year students as it can help them with the preparation for the CESS exam.Course Assignments: 70% Attendance at the weekly seminars. All the readings are uploaded on the course page in MOODLE. You are expected to read all the assigned readings on the day they are listed on the syllabus, and send “talking points” (a brief synthesis of the main points from the day’s readings and a “discussion question[s]” based on those readings, altogether min. 1 PAGE per title. Your talking points and questions must be sent to the Moodle page of this course at least two hours BEFORE each class. Two annotations can be missed without an apology. In total, you have to submit 10 annotations. Till the end of the examination period, you will also turn in a short essay [approx. 5-7 pages] summarizing and comparing arguments of two titles of your choice from the list of required readings, including a section with your own thought and reactions.

Anthropology of Ritual

Code: YBA326 Lecturer: Seidlová,V.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Studies of ritual continue to be of critical interest in anthropology. This course explores anthropological approaches to ritual as a universal feature of human social life. Attention will be given to key anthropological concepts (e.g. rites of passage, liminality, anti-structure, communitas, performative aspects of ritual). Although ritual is sometimes considered as primarily related to religion, the anthropological approach requires that ritual be situated not only in religious but also in secular contexts, such as: politics and power relations, the construction of social identities and boundaries, the reproduction and invention of 'tradition' or social memory practices, globalization, commodification etc. We will also problematize the dichotomy of sacred and secular while discussing practices of today’s individualized spirituality. Special focus will be paid to the negotiation of sound dimensions of ritual practice.Requirements: Minimum 500 words annotations of 6 assigned readings (except from the 1st week) uploaded in the moodle course page, here https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=8610 AND a 10 min powerpoint presentation of a selected ethnographic case of a ritual performance interpreted with the help of theoretical concepts from mandatory readings.Weekly ONLINE classes through MS Teams: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3a96512c78ea2c4c6aa88c08a831ff32f4%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=a86b0698-f7b4-474d-a2aa-5f1597f87f02&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2FOR MORE DETAILS SEE THE ATTACHED SYLLABUS 2020.

Body, Health and Society

Code: YBA246 Lecturer: Wolfová,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
This course aims to introduce different approaches to the body, health, and illness from the perspective of sociocultural anthropology. How can we study body and health-related issues? And what kind of understanding can we get based on these different approaches? The course is open to full-time and Erasmus students. Moreover, it is designed to contribute to the full-time students´ preparations for the compulsory Comprehensive exam in Social Sciences (CESS). Based on the part of the readings for the third part of CESS, the development of anthropological thinking about the body, health and illness will be discussed. Through the in-class exercises, students will practice the skills of critical reading, writing, and text comparison. These are essential for the successful completion of the third part of CESS exam as well as for the completion of the dissertation. The course will take place online via MS Teams (code for the enrollment: ). The sessions will take up to 70minutes and will have a seminar form, where selected reading will be reviewed and the key concepts discussed and applied on the body or health-related topics. Therefore preparation (readings, synopses) creates an inherent part of the course.

Bohemian (Contemporary) Art in Global Philosophical Context

Code: YBAJ165 Lecturer: Váša,O.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The course will confront selected philosophical texts, essays or excerpts directly with art, following a question that haunted the avant-garde movement ever since it started: if art is supposed to negate all the restraints and nors that the world imposes on it, to cross all the boundaries there are or to be as independent and free as possible, does not a murder - as an absolutely radical act negating everything including life itself - represent an ultimate temptation of avant-garde art (as thematized by Lars von Trier in The House that Jack Built, 2018)? Naturally, such conclusion is wholly absurd, yet it provokes a series of questions that are of prime importance for contemporary art: issues of limits of art or its realation to politics, public space or life etc. As for the topics, we will discuss the problem of a relationship between art and politics, art and freedom, art and its critical potential, limits of art, paradoxes of avant-garde movement, alienation of the contemporary world etc.  We will also read the excerpts from authors like Adorno, Chalupecký, Ranciere, Danto...OFF-LINE VERSION OF THE CLASSES (if possible): The course will take place "in the field", meaning that all the discussions and lectures will take place in the galleries among the artworks that we will address along with the texts. We will visit both temporary and permanent exhibitions and collections, including those of the National Gallery in Prague, Museum Kampa, Prague City Gallery, DOX - Centre for Contemporary Art. We will also visit the local galleries and temporary exhibitions of contemporary art, including the Foundation and Centre for Contemporary Art, which will arrange the meetings with the artists for us. We will thus have an opportunity to ask the authors themselves: about their motivations and thoughts or about the artworks. ON-LINE ALTERNATIVE: The on-line classes will be held via the MS-TEAMS platform in the form of the live interactive webinars (commented presentations, discussions etc.), including the discussions with the selected artists or guided tours of the virtual museums.IMPORTANT INFO (regarding the off-line classes): The students will have to pay the (highly reduced) entrance fees, 20 to 60 CZK per a visit (some visits will be free). The meeting point will be specified via email each time, yet generally speaking, we will visit the galleries on Tuesday, 11:00-12:20. Please be aware that however the lectures themselves will take 1h20m, the visit, including the trip from Troja and back, if you have any additional evening courses, can take up to 2,5 hours.

CEE Economic Growth and Development

Code: YBAU08 Lecturer: Kudashvili,N. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2. Why are some countries poor and other countries rich? What are the factors of growth? What is the role of political and economic institutions in the development process? How can aid foster growth and development? This course aims to address these questions in view of the theory and empirics of economic growth.

Central European Film

Code: YBAC007 Lecturer: Dominková,P. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.This course examines the most important trends and movements in the history of Czech and Central European cinematography. It also puts films within their historical (political and cultural) context.Chronology of the Czech film history is combined with thematic and stylistic analysis. During class sessions, students engage in discussions on specific themes and watch films or clips from films that represent these themes.

Cities in Civilization

Code: YBH238 Lecturer: Tourek,J.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
In the winter semmester 2021 there will be lectures on history of the City of Prague in world (european) urban context. … THIS COURSE IS INTENDED FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDENTS. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ENROL BUT THE LIMIT OF STUDENTS IS FULL DO NOT HESITATE AND LET ME KNOW.…

Collective Memory and Its Research

Code: YMH522 Lecturer: Šubrt,J. + Coman,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
In tThe course presents the essential paradigms of collective memory research are presented. Besides French and German authors that extensively influenced the discourse of collective memory, such as Maurice Halbwachs, Pierre Nora, Paul Ricoeur, Aleida and Jan Assmann and others, the representatives of more Euro-Atlantic school of thinking are also presented (e. g. Paul Connerton, Jeffrey C. Alexander). The Sseminar further presents these concepts in particular instances and exposes various research agendas of collective memory studies. The main purpose of the seminar is to familiarize students with various possible approaches to collective memory and through concrete examples highlight the topical relevance of collective memory research in today’s social sciences. Students finish the course by presentatingon of their own research project in the field of collective memory, frequently using the data and sources from their MA thesis research, i.e. analyzing them specifically through the approaches to collective memory presented throughout the course.

Comprehending the Holocaust

Code: YBAU011 Lecturer: Plzák,M. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.We will go through the rise and history of Christian anti-Judaism, its transformation into modern forms of anti-Semitism, we will discuss what is exceptional and what is normal about the Holocaust and define the role and responsibility of the individual in modern democracy. We will learn about the role of intellectuals during the Holocaust and discuss how good people can kill other people so easily. We will also try to understand the function of Nazi propaganda and its major themes. We will touch on the phenomenon of "denying the Holocaust", which is a modern form of anti-Semitism.

Continent of Failed Hope”: Latin America from Cold War to the “Pink Tide” (1953-2006)

Code: YBAJ156 Lecturer: Kalenda,F.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
This module aims to present formative issues in modern history of the Latin American “continent”, beginning with the revolutions and counter-revolutions during the Cold War and culminating with the rise of new brand of left-wing populists, such as Hugo Chávez and Evo Morales. Combining political, social and cultural history, it is based on series of case studies from different Latin American countries that are presented both in their regional and wider global context.Practical side note: Due to the health situation, this module is currently taught via the MS Teams platform. In order to join the respective team, please, contact the teacher or use the following link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3a3925e5f7827a49d1808824d38f3798b6%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=15a3dedd-4051-4203-8e35-df6e38f3b1e7&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2

Controversial Issues in Anthropology

Code: YBAJ024 Lecturer: Heřmanský,M.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course will introduce students to selected issues in sociocultural anthropology through the means of reading and interpretation of anthropological papers. It aims to develop critical anthropological thinking and interpretiveskills. Each class will deal with one controversial issue in anthropology which remains unresolved. Each issue will be presented in two papers holding antagonist positions. Students will be expected to read both papers designated for each week in advance, before each class, and comprehend them to that extent to be able to discuss them in class.

Crisis and Culture in Central European Capitals (Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Berlin), 1848-1939

Code: YBAC051 Lecturer: Vassogne,G. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at https://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.This course discusses the emergence of major modernist movements and ideas in the three Central European cities: Prague, Vienna, and Budapest.

Czech (Pre-)Intermediate

Code: YBAJ058 Lecturer: Převrátilová,S. + Lukešová,L.
Semester: Spring Language: Czech
ECTS credits: 4
If needed, the lessons will take place online as scheduled. Students will receive the access code by e-mail. The course is also supported in Moodle.Czech language courses are for full degree (or Erasmus) students of the Faculty of Humanities. Full degree students from other faculties should take Czech lessons in their home faculty.Topics covered in previous semester will be reviewed and extended for the students to become more confident in communication in Czech in every-day situations, such as social interaction, shopping, travel, illness etc. The course provides insight into the Czech language system as well as Czech culture. The key aspect of the class is communicative competence, with emphasis on speaking and listening. Grammar is simplified and students will learn it through texts, tables and exercises that help them discover and apply the rules in real-life contexts. Every lesson, students will be assigned homework to practise and extend the topics covered in class. For the course, students need to have the coursebook ČESKY KROK ZA KROKEM 1 (this is what it looks like http://eshop.czechstepbystep.cz/p/191/cesky-krok-za-krokem-1-anglicka). By the end of the course students will reach level A1 according to the CEFR. The course may reach level A2. In order to get the credit for the course, attendance is mandatory (min. 75%).

Czech Art and Architecture: from the Middle Ages to the 21st Century

Code: YBAC008 Lecturer: Krummholz,M. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at https://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.The course examines key developments in Czech visual art and architecture from the early Medieval to the contemporary period within the European context. Slide-based lectures are supplemented with visits to representative monuments, museums, and art collections in Prague.

Czech Language Course for Beginners

Code: YBAJ057 Lecturer: Převrátilová,S. + Lukešová,L.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course will be taught on-line as long as necessary. Registered students will receive a link to the vitrual classroom.This course is primarily for ERASMUS students.It targets students that are staying in the Czech Republic for a limited period of time and need to cover the basis of the language in order to communicate in everyday situations. The ultimate aim is to provide the students with basic skills, grammar and vocabulary to deal with the life in the Czech Republic, to give them an idea of the Czech language system as well as Czech culture.

David Hume Seminar

Code: YBF224 Lecturer: Kunca,T.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Summer semester 2021 - online seminar here: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/channel/19%3a13d8a88db9324032a4d0f1af6bd387a2%40thread.tacv2/Obecn%25C3%25A9?groupId=7ac53d4a-c892-45ae-b290-10b0e120f18e&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2Course is designed not only for students interested in Hume studies and history of the British philosophy but for everyone who would like to write an essay in Philosophy. Hume´s mastery in essay writing is well known and established fact. Therefore a student is free to make a choice to write an essay in Hume studies and history of the British philosophy (inspired by seminar programme) or write an independent 2000 words essay and attend at least three face-to-face tutorials checking her/his progress in essay writing.Course main focus in Winter semester 2015/16 are the beginnigs of Hume´s philosophy, Summer semester 2015/16 is designed to read and discuss Book 1 of Hume´s A Tratise of Human Nature.Summer semester 2021: Hume´s moral philosophy in the context (Compulsory reading is Hume´s ECPM, 2 presentations in semester, and final essay,

Design of Quantitative Research II.

Code: YMH540 Lecturer: Jirkovská,B. + Hampl,S.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
There is a follow-up course for this class, ‘Design of Quantitative Research’, which aims to extend students' knowledge and the practical skills required for the quantitative data management and to demonstrate the most common applications of quantitative sociological research and their context.

Discourse Analysis

Code: YMH537 Lecturer: Šťovíčková Jantulová,M. + Coman,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course presents qualitative research methodology, focusinged on analysis of public discourse. The Ttheoretical part is to provides an essential orientation in the origins of discourse analysis (DA) and DA’s current applications (critical discourses analysis – CDA in particular). Initially, the two original sources are identified: a) symbolic interactionism with its interest in the interaction order, b) post-structuralist tendency with its focus on language and discourse. Thus, besides Foucault's discourse the attention is paid to Goffman's frame analysis, including application to picture frames. In the practical part students independently engage their own themes and identify specific research and methodological issues of DA and CDA approach. Students should acquire the knowledge and skills to be able to carry out an independent research based on DA and CDA.

Economic History and Long-Run Development

Code: YBAU037 Lecturer: Ochsner,C. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at https://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-1016.html. This course provides an overview of economic history and the long-run development of socio-economic figures and focuses on the situation in CEE in particular. It provides the big picture of economic development from a European and US-centric point of view and links that to specific circumstances in CEE countries.

Economic Systems from a Historical-Sociological Perspective

Code: YMH505 Lecturer: Štemberk,J. + Čábelková,I.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The aim of the course is 1) to provide an overview of the historical development of economic systems on the macro level of analysis on lectures; 2) to discuss particular aspects of economic and social processes in the historical-sociological context in student presentation and group discussions; 3) analyze the particular factors that were associated with particular historical phases of socioeconomic development and interrelations of these factors in student papers; 4) improve students’ presentation and writing skills.Lectures will draw on selected texts from the history of economic theories as well as sociological texts concerning modernization processes. We will also use existing high-quality video content. The course will combine lectures with student presentations and discussions. Link to the course in MS Teamshttps://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_ZjAzYjY5YjctMWIyNS00NzRhLThkNTctNzc3YTFiOTIyMzI4%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%22494a9a9c-aab9-4ba4-bbee-c79e75087692%22%7d

Economics and Psychology

Code: YBA130 Lecturer: Špecián,P.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
For a long time, the standard economic paradigm was dominated by models whose core assumption was that of rationality. However, various findings from cognitive and social psychology suggest that people are often prone to systematic errors, and have unexpected beliefs and preferences. How are the real people different from homo economicus? What heuristics do we rely upon in our reasoning and how may these heuristics lead us astray? How can irrationality be exploited in the markets and in politics? Should the government intervene to protect people from their own irrational choices? In the Economics and Psychology seminar, we will try to find answers to these questions as well as to many others. The seminar concentrates on how the psychological findings may enhance our reasoning about economic affairs and on their implications for applied policy. The core parts of our effort in the seminar will be home-assigned readings and classroom discussion.In the Winter Semester of 2021/22, the course will be taught online via MS Teams.

Economics of Transition

Code: YBAU005 Lecturer: Semerák,V. + Skladanová,N. + Havlištová,V.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.The course deals with main economic issues related to transition from centrally-planned economies of the Soviet bloc, Yugoslavia, and China to market economies. Compared to other similar courses, this course will be less descriptive and more analytical; we will use economic models and results of econometric studies where appropriate.

Ernst Cassirer, a bridge between two cultures and between rival philosophical traditions

Code: YMFPR209 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: French
ECTS credits: 5
Ernst Cassirer (1874-1945) est sans doute la figure majeure du néo-kantisme, courant dominant de la philosophie européenne entre 1870 environ et la premiere guerre mondiale. Cassirer a développé une philosophie de la culture néo-kantienne couvrant a la fois les mathématiques et les sciences empiriques que les humanités. En plus d’avoir été un pont entre ces « deux cultures », Cassirer aura également été un pont entre deux des traditions philosophiques majeures de la philosophie du XXe siecle, a savoir la philosophie analytique et la philosophie continentale. Dans ce cours, nous présenterons la philosophie de Cassirer a travers la lecture d’extraits de ses textes théoriques majeurs (Substance et Fonction et La Philosophie des formes symboliques) en nous souciant de préciser sa place dans le mouvement néo-kantien et la philosophie de son époque.

European Economies in Transition

Code: YBAC151 Lecturer: Balcar,T. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.The course focuses on applying economic analysis to the comparison of different economic systems and understanding of the functioning of those systems with an emphasis on transition economies.

European Philosophy

Code: YMFPR156 Lecturer: Sepp,H.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 6
The Self and the Limits of Reflection ????? ???????: as the motto at the temple of Apollo at Delphi makes clear, the self and the ways of knowing it stand at the beginning of European thought. With regard to the relation between theoretical or already extra-theoretical reflection and the self, it is to be asked whether the ‘self’ is thereby sufficiently grasped that it is determined as a correlate of re-reflection at all, or whether it does not rather refer to a corporeal movement that always already exists before it is reflexively recognized. This does not deny the possibility of reflex-ive cognition, but expresses the fact that the ‘self’ is always grasped anew, but that it can never be fathomed and therefore cannot be ‘appropriated’. This leads, among other things, to the question of what this means for a determination of self-realization in the field of ten-sion of recognition and transformation of realizing the own Self, especially in view of the encounter with the Other.

European-American Relations in the 21st Century

Code: YBAU017 Lecturer: Zieleniec,J. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.This course explores the history and the current state of political, economic and culturalrelations between the United States and Europe.

Feminism and Environmental Movements

Code: YMGS625 Lecturer: Helman,I.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course introduces students to the intersection of feminism and the environmental movement. Together we explore why feminism grounds itself in a deep concern for the environment as well as the link between feminist theory and the current environmental crisis. We survey the background and history of the movement as well as its contemporary diversity. In addition, this course investigates the origins of the current environmental crisis in Western science, philosophy and religion and devotes considerable time to the following topics in ecofeminist thought: politics, responsible citizenship, economics, materialism, ethics, animals, vegetarianism and religion. While examining various feminist critiques of this situation, we concentrate mostly on feminist solutions to the crisis.

Feminist Political Theory

Code: YMGS614 Lecturer: Kobová,Ĺ.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
AnotaceKurz se zaměřuje na několik základních konceptů a tematických oblastí současné feministické politické teorie a filozofie a jejich prostřednictvím představuje zásadní feministicko-politické diskuse a jejich argumenty. Jde především o vztah soukromého a veřejného, který se zkoumá i prostřednictvím feministického kritického čtení kanonických textů politické filozofie, a také o vztah univerzálního a partikulárního. Kurz představuje feministickou politickou teorii jako projekt, který se pohybuje na poli demokratické teorie a na poli teorie emancipace. Tematické okruhy1. Projekty feministické politické teorie2. Rodina jako spona mezi veřejným a soukromým3. Domov a hodnota soukromí4. Politická ontologie těla a veřejnosti5. Multikulturalismus a univerzalismus6. Rovnost a emancipace7. Afektivní teorie univerzalizmu8. Feministické přístupy k demokratické teorii9. Deliberativní demokracie10. Radikální demokracie11. Feministické přístupy ke svobodě12. Foucaultovské interpretace svobody13. Arendtovské interpretace svobody

Feminist Proposals for a Peaceful Future

Code: YMGS629 Lecturer: Sokolová,V. + Helman,I.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
In this course, the student will trace the historical relationship between the earliest days of feminist interaction with the peace movement in which feminists have attempted to create (a) better future(s). We will discuss feminist involvement in anti-slavery campaigns to anti-nuclear arms protests and from prohibition to utopian visions of the future. This course will pay particular attention to feminist philosophical discussions about time, peace, and gender (including gender roles). Finally, we will look at imagined feminist futures through their most often visible lens: science-fiction literature and utopia/dystopia

Film as a Mirror of History, Ideology, and Individual Freedom

Code: YBAU020 Lecturer: Brdečková,T. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.This lively and original course is open to students who have an interest in studying the social and political transition in Central Europe through an understanding of its cinema. This is not a traditional film course: We will focus on the films’ social, political and historical contexts.

Franz Kafka and Central European Literature

Code: YBAC048 Lecturer: Pospíšil,J. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at https://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.The course focuses on Franz Kafka’s short stories and two of his unfinished novels within the context of Prague German literature. Kafka is examined within the framework of the modernist culture of the fin de siecle and early 20th century Vienna, and in relation to contemporary Czech authors and the expressionist and other Avant-garde movements. Using the methodologies of both literary and intellectual historians, the course provides background in the dominant and thought giving voices on the literature on Kafka - from his contemporaries up to the present day - approaching Kafka’s work as a path towards the understanding of our time, and as a possible "passage into modernity".

From Propaganda to Post-Truth: A History of Fake News

Code: YBAC47 Lecturer: Pospíšil,F. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.What is news? What is fake news? And what can these concepts tell us about the societies that employ them? In this course, students will explore the varied social actors and media forms that have historically been linked with the dissemination of “the truth.” The class will consider when, and to what ends, different media have been utilized to confer a veneer of truth upon information its authors knew to be false.

Gender and Psychology

Code: YMGS626 Lecturer: Helman,I.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
AnnotationIn this course, the student will explore a variety of themes at the intersection of gender and psychology, including gendered concepts of moral development, feminist insights and critical theory and current trends and concerns. In addition, this course will explore gender as a cateogry within psychological theory as well as the construction of masculinity and feminity. Specific topics include: sexual harassment; women in prison; domestic abuse; disease and mental health; and body images and mental health.

Gender and Religion

Code: YMGS601 Lecturer: Knotková,B. + Helman,I.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
In this course, students explore the combination of feminism and religion. Students will be introduced to feminist engagement within religion, religious studies and th(e/a)ology, focusing on six major religious traditions (Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, the Goddess Movement (sometimes called feminist spirituality), and Hinduism). This course pays special attention to three main areas of feminist engagement with religion: the feminist critique of religion; feminist methodology; and feminist reconstructive the(a/o)logy. Key concepts considered time and again throughout the duration of the course are dualism, reform, revolution, sex, gender, images of the divine, leadership roles, rituals, sacred texts, ethics, power and authority, roles, feminism, and religion.

Gender, Nature, Culture

Code: YMGS628 Lecturer: Lorenz - Meyer,D.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
AnnotationIn this course we explore the entanglements of gender, nature and culture that have been at the heart of feminist theory and activism. These concerns have gained renewed feminist attention in the era some call the Anthropocene where human activities irreparably have impacted on geological, biotic and climatic processes. What does it mean to live in the ruins of capitalism and what life and specifically feminist and queer politics can be generated when there is no simple cure or going back to pre-industrial times? These questions will take us to theories of racism and colonialism as much as gender and queer studies and human animal studies.The course will proceed through engaging case studies, as well as an exercise of creative ‘energy writing’ that will take us out of the classroom to expand our always more than human sensorium, train our writing skills and attune us the environment.Topics1. Welcome to the Anthropocene2. Thinking with Natureculture Entanglements3. Queer Animals? Thinking Trans* with Nonhuman Animals4. Nonlinear Biology and Sympoeisis5. Queer Ecologies and Politics6. Petro- and Plastic Capitalist Cultures7. (Non)Western Ontologies: Querying Life and Nonlife & Midterm Review8. Expanding the Human Sensorium: The Art of Noticing & Fieldtrip9. Caring for Nonhuman Kin10. Agential Realism11. Nuclearity: Memory, Affect and Politics of Nonhuman Witnessing12. The Politics of Waste & Review of Concepts13. The Politics of Nature: an (Eco)Cosmopolitan Proposal & Roleplay

German Classical Philosophy

Code: YMFPR152 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 8
!Following the decision of the Head of the Deutsche und franzoesische Philosophie in Europa (EuroPhilosophie) study programme, this course will be taught online during the winter semester of the 2021-22 academic year. The details will follow towards the beginning of the semester. Students who enroll in the course will get information about the link to the virtual classroom directly from the teacher or through a message in the SIS.!Kants System der FreiheitInhalt des Seminars ist Kants System der praktischen Philosophie, deren gedanklicher Gang anhand der Lektüre ihrer Hauptwerke nachgezeichnet werden soll. Leitend ist dabei der Gedanke, dass die Freiheit als Prinzip nicht bloß ihren Anfang bildet, sondern das System selbst als Explikation der Idee der Freiheit zu verstehen ist. Die Freiheit ist in diesem Sinne sowohl Prinzip der Einheit, indem sie den einen Grundsatz der praktischen Vernunft als ein unbedingtes Sollen ausdrückt, als auch der Gliederung des Systems als einer Metaphysik der Rechts-, Tugend- und Staatslehre. Entsprechend sollen im Seminar Texte der praktischen Philosophie Kants (Grundlegung zur Metaphysik der Sitten, Kritik der praktischen Vernunft, Metaphysik der Sitten) auszugsweise gelesen werden. Die Stellenauswahl wird zu Beginn des Semesters bekannt gegeben.

German for Philosophers

Code: YBFC212 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 3
Diese Übung hat das Ziel, bereits erworbene Kompetenzen im Sprechen, Schreiben sowie im Hör- und Textverstehen der deutschen Sprache weiter zu vertiefen. Außerdem sollen Wortschatzkenntnisse erweitert sowie grammatische Fähigkeiten gefestigt werden. Diskutiert werden sollen im Rahmen der Übung Auszüge deutscher philosophischer Texte zum Themenkreis Argumentation und Logik sowie ggf. für diesen Themenkomplex geeignete Videos. Des Weiteren werden wir kleinere literarische und historiographische Texte lesen, um etwaige Unterschiede innerhalb des Deutschen im Hinblick auf Gattung und Zeitgeist ausfindig machen zu können. In der ersten Sitzung findet ein Einstufungstest statt. Teilnahmevoraussetzung: Deutschkenntnisse auf dem Niveau B1/B2

German for Philosophers

Code: YMFPR171 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 2
Diese Übung hat das Ziel, bereits erworbene Kompetenzen im Sprechen, Schreiben sowie im Hör- und Textverstehen der deutschen Sprache weiter zu vertiefen. Außerdem sollen Wortschatzkenntnisse erweitert sowie grammatische Fähigkeiten gefestigt werden. Diskutiert werden sollen im Rahmen der Übung Auszüge deutscher philosophischer Texte zum Themenkreis Argumentation und Logik sowie ggf. für diesen Themenkomplex geeignete Videos. Des Weiteren werden wir kleinere literarische und historiographische Texte lesen, um etwaige Unterschiede innerhalb des Deutschen im Hinblick auf Gattung und Zeitgeist ausfindig machen zu können. In der ersten Sitzung findet ein Einstufungstest statt. Teilnahmevoraussetzung: Deutschkenntnisse auf dem Niveau B1/B2

German for Philosophers II.

Code: YMFPR13 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Spring Language: German
ECTS credits: 2
Diese Übung hat das Ziel, bereits erworbene Kompetenzen im Sprechen, Schreiben sowie im Hör- und Textverstehen der deutschen Sprache weiter zu vertiefen. Außerdem sollen Wortschatzkenntnisse erweitert sowie grammatische Fähigkeiten gefestigt werden. Diskutiert werden sollen im Rahmen der Übung Auszüge deutscher philosophischer Texte zum Themenkreis Argumentation und Logik sowie ggf. für diesen Themenkomplex geeignete Videos. Des Weiteren werden wir kleinere literarische und historiographische Texte lesen, um etwaige Unterschiede innerhalb des Deutschen im Hinblick auf Gattung und Zeitgeist ausfindig machen zu können. In der ersten Sitzung findet ein Einstufungstest statt. Teilnahmevoraussetzung: Deutschkenntnisse auf dem Niveau B1/B2

Global Communication

Code: YBAU015 Lecturer: Nesbitt,T. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area ofinternational/global communication.

Hippocratic writings

Code: YBAJ085 Lecturer: Bartoš,H.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
In this course we will read and discuss some of the so called “Hippocratic“ treatises (such as The Oath, On the Nature of Man, On Sacred Disease, and Airs, Waters, Places). We shall explore the variety of the Hippocratic texts, authors and theories and compare the ancient ideas and therapeutic methods with our modern views on health, disease and the means of therapy.

Historical Anthropology of Gift Exchange

Code: YBAJ160 Lecturer: Čapská,V.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
In accordance with the valid epidemiological measures the course will be most probably taught online, at least in the first weeks.The course will analyse modes of gift exchange in pre-modern Europe. It strives to de-romanticize our contemporary idealized understanding of gift-giving as a purely altruistic practice. Thus, it will make use of the concepts of social and cultural anthropology and show how gift exchange worked in the societies in which individuals were more vulnerable and more dependent on each other than today. It will draw students'attention to the so-called ego-documents as useful sources for tracing economic behaviour, including the practices and ideas of gift exchange. We will ask what steps historical actors made to forge fair exchange deals and to cultivate more balanced relationships. We will explore what people donated most and in what ways their life stages and religious affiliations shaped their perception and practices of giving.LiteratureZoltán Biedermann – Anne Gerritsen – Giorgio Riello (edd.), Global Gifts. The Material Culture of Diplomacy in Early Modern Eurasia, Cambridge 2018.Natalie Z. Davis, The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France, Madison 2000.Engin Isin – Ebru Üstündag, Wills, Deeds, Acts: Women's Civic Gift Giving in Ottoman Istanbul, Gender, Place and Culture 15, 2008, 519–532.Marcel Mauss, The Gift, London 1990.Joshua Teplitsky, A “Prince of the Land of Israel” in Prague: Jewish Philathropy, Patronage, and Power in Early Modern Europe and Beyond, Jewish History 29, 2015, 245–271.Irma Thoen, Strategic Affection? Gift Exchange of Seventeenth-Century Holland, Amsterdam 2006, 9–44.

Historical Anthropology of Gift Exchange

Code: YMHA44 Lecturer: Čapská,V.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 5
In accordance with the valid epidemiological measures the course will be most probably taught online, at least in the first weeks.The course will analyse modes of gift exchange in pre-modern Europe. It strives to de-romanticize our contemporary idealized understanding of gift-giving as a purely altruistic practice. Thus, it will make use of the concepts of social and cultural anthropology and show how gift exchange worked in the societies in which individuals were more vulnerable and more dependent on each other than today. It will draw students'attention to the so-called ego-documents as useful sources for tracing economic behaviour, including the practices and ideas of gift exchange. We will ask what steps historical actors made to forge fair exchange deals and to cultivate more balanced relationships. We will explore what people donated most and in what ways their life stages and religious affiliations shaped their perception and practices of giving.LiteratureZoltán Biedermann – Anne Gerritsen – Giorgio Riello (edd.), Global Gifts. The Material Culture of Diplomacy in Early Modern Eurasia, Cambridge 2018.Natalie Z. Davis, The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France, Madison 2000.Engin Isin – Ebru Üstündag, Wills, Deeds, Acts: Women's Civic Gift Giving in Ottoman Istanbul, Gender, Place and Culture 15, 2008, 519–532.Marcel Mauss, The Gift, London 1990.Joshua Teplitsky, A “Prince of the Land of Israel” in Prague: Jewish Philathropy, Patronage, and Power in Early Modern Europe and Beyond, Jewish History 29, 2015, 245–271.Irma Thoen, Strategic Affection? Gift Exchange of Seventeenth-Century Holland, Amsterdam 2006, 9–44.

Historical Anthropology of Migration

Code: YBAJ084 Lecturer: Čapská,V.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
This course will be taught in person. For the case of stricter hygienic measures the course has a team in MS Teams which students can access via the URL: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3aiZ_kUvQQaq3J1cS-poKOOVwJ-o3l1ubQHO2Cb1_LrVc1%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=ca7d99bc-019b-4d39-b834-8a7ccbcc8161&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2In this course we will explore migration from the joint perspectives of history and sociocultural anthropology. We will engage with key analytical concepts in migration history and ask what historical sources can be used to study mobility and what are the possibilities and limits in interpreting these historical records. The main focus will be on pre-modern history. We will read and discuss the assigned texts. Each student will prepare an in-class presentation. In the course the teacher will also make use of her participation in the European research network Women on the Move and will enable students to have „hands-on“ experience in this project (the research network webpage: https://www.womenonthemove.eu/).

Historical Anthropology of Migration

Code: YMHA48 Lecturer: Čapská,V.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 5
This course will be taught in person. For the case of stricter hygienic measures the course has a team in MS Teams which students can access via the URL: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3aiZ_kUvQQaq3J1cS-poKOOVwJ-o3l1ubQHO2Cb1_LrVc1%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=ca7d99bc-019b-4d39-b834-8a7ccbcc8161&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2In this course we will explore migration from the joint perspectives of history and sociocultural anthropology. We will engage with key analytical concepts in migration history and ask what historical sources can be used to study mobility and what are the possibilities and limits in interpreting these historical records. The main focus will be on pre-modern history. We will read and discuss the assigned texts. Each student will prepare an in-class presentation. In the course the teacher will also make use of her participation in the European research network Women on the Move and will enable students to have „hands-on“ experience in this project (the research network webpage: https://www.womenonthemove.eu/)

Historical Comparative Sociology

Code: YMH501 Lecturer: Šubrt,J.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
The lecture course introduces the students to the theoretical basics and to the basic thematic direction of their master's degree program. Attention is paid to the beginnings, developments and current state of historical sociology, which are primarily observed with regard to the thinking of its main representatives (Weber, Elias, Tilly, Wallerstein, Eisenstadt, etc.). The aim of the lecture is to give students a comprehensive overview of the state and perspectives of historical sociology, to orient them in its basic questions and problems and to prepare them for further study of this field especially on the theoretical side.

Historical Sociology of Genocide

Code: YMH730 Lecturer: Kumsa,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The aim of the courseThe aim of the course is to elucidate the problem of genocide in human history, its causes and consequences. Sociologically, genocide is defined as a form of one-sided mass killing in which a state or other authority intends to destroy a group, as that group and membership in it are defined by the perpetrator. In this course different approaches to genocide will be discussed; we illustrate a types of genocide based on motives of the perpetrator. This course from historical perspective concentrates on modern era genocide.The structure of the course1. The concept of genocide2. Different approaches to the study of genocide and its typology 3. Classical and Middle Ages genocide 4. Genocidal Massacres in Early Modern South East Asia5. Genocide during Spanish Conquest of New World6. Colonial North America and genocide in the USA7. Genocidal violence in 19th century Australia & Tasmania8. Colonial genocides in Africa 9. Genocides in independent Latin American states10. Armenian Genocide &Holocaust under Nazi Germany11. Genocides in Asia in the 20th century12. Genocides after independence in AfricaLiteratureBernard Jessie. 1949. American Community Behavior. New York: Dryden.Braudel Fernand. 1967. Capitalism and Material life: 1400-1800. New York: Harper and Row.Chalk Frank and Jonassohn. 1990. The History and Sociology of Genocide: Analyses and case studies. New Haven & London: Yale University Press.Chorover Stephan L. 1979. From Genesis to Genocide. The Meaning of Human Nature and the power of Behavior control. Cambridge: MIT Press. Dadrian Vahakn. N., A Typology of Genocide. International review of Modern Sociology. 5 (Fall 1975): 201-12Fein Helen.1984. Scenarios of Genocide: Models of Genocide and Critical Responses. In Toward the understanding and Prevention of Genocide. Israel W. Chary (ed.). Boulder and London: Westview Press.Gellately Robert & Kiernan Ben (Eds.). 2003. The spectre of genocide: Mass murder in the historical perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University press. Hannah Arendt. 1958. The Origin of Totalitarianism. Cleveland: World Publishing.Kiernan Ben.2007. Blood and soil. A world history of genocide and extermination from Sparta to Darfur. New Haven & London: Yale University Press.Kuper Leo. 1981. Genocide: Its political use in the twentieth century. New York: Penguin Books.Kuper Leo. 1985. The prevention of Genocide. New Haven: Yale University Press.Lemkin Raphael. 1944. Axis Rule in Occupied Europe. Washington, D.C. Carnegie Endowment. Maimark Norman M. 2017. Genocide: A World History. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Naranch Bradley and Eley Geoff (eds.). 2014. German Colonialism in A Global Age. Durham and London: Duke University.Prunier Gérard. 1995. The Rwandan Crisis: History of a Genocide. London: Hurst & Company.Prunier Gérard. 2009. From Genocide to Continental War. The ‘Congolese’ conflict and crisis of Contemporary Africa. London: Hurst & CompanyShelton Dinah L. (ed.). 2005. Encyclopaedia of Genocide and Crimes against Humanity. New York and London: Thomson Gale.

Historical Sociology of Global Politics and International Relations

Code: YMH546 Lecturer: Německý,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
Traditional sociology was based on so called methodological nationalism, as when it non-reflectively identified the society with the national state. The aim of the lecture is to exceed this narrow conception and introduce a historical sociology of politics in a global context. The lecture is methodologically based on a theory of international relations and mainly on historical-sociological approaches toin the theory of international relations.

Historical Sociology of Knowledge, Culture, and Religion

Code: YMH503 Lecturer: Havelka,M. + Coman,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course uses the perspective of historical sociology in order to study various aspects of knowledge, culture, and religion. By reading the works of prominent sociologists, historians, and historical-sociologists, students will learn of different theories pertaining to the development of these fields throughout history. Through a comparative and critical reading of the texts, students will learn how similar phenomena might be given a variety of interpretations when studied with different tools and looked at from different perspectives.

Historical Sociology of Politics

Code: YMH511 Lecturer: Německý,M.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
This course focuses on the historical construction of the modern political system. The state, the citizenship, nationality and globalization are the main points of focus. Therefore, course graduates should be able to analyse the social and historical context of the political process, understand issue frame construction and the weight of structures within social evolutions.

History of Human Rights in International Relations

Code: YMN0HHR Lecturer: Muhič Dizdarevič,S.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The goal of the course is to introduce students to the following topics: current definitions of human rights, controversy over different generations of human rights, history of human rights from ancient Greece up to contemporary philosophical and political science definitions, differences between natural and human rights, disputes with moral relativism, moral vs. legal rights, claim rights and liberty rights, scope and justification of human rights, HR as the dominant geopolitical doctrine of modern times, HR in international law and HR within the UN. Special attention will be paid to theories of international relations and place of the HR agenda in it. Students will be encouraged to discuss current HR issues and illustrate the theories with political events.The creation of this course was funded by the Operational Programme Prague - Adaptability, cofinanced by the European Social Fund.

Hormones and Behavior

Code: YMPC005 Lecturer: Pfaus,J. + Martinec Nováková,L.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Náplní tohoto kurzu je výklad o rozličných způsobech, jak hormony, jež jsou vylučovány z různých částí těla a mozku, ovlivňují aktivitu neurálních, endokrinních a smyslových systémů, a tak ovlivňují regulační, cílesměrné a adaptivní chování u zvířat i člověka. Kurz zahájíme základní anatomií a fyziologií endokrinních a neuroendokrinních systémů a klasifikací steroidních a peptidových hormonů, které produkují. Dále budou pojednávány farmakologické a molekulární mechanismy, skrze něž steroidní a peptidové hormony navozují změny v buňkách. Poté se budeme zabývat tím, jak hormony ovlivňují různé regulační systémy a jak zpětná vazba v rámci různých hormonálně zprostředkovaných okruhů zajišťuje udržování homeostázy. Pak se podíváme na organizační a aktivační efekty hormonů a na to, jakým způsobem přispívají k pohlavní diferenciaci mozku a chování. Uprostřed semestru si napíšete test. Následně se zaměříme na to, jakou roli hormony hrají v chování, zvláště pak sexuálním chování a reprodukci, těhotenství a porodu, rodičovském chování, agresi, potravním chování, reakcích na stres, imunitních funkcích, náladě a různých kognitivních schopnostech. Předmět je celý vyučován v anglickém jazyce (přednášející - Prof. Pfaus - hovoří pouze anglicky).

Housing Estates, Ideology, and Architecture in Prague

Code: YBAJ087 Lecturer: Špaček,O. + Babić,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The course on housing estates in Prague, the paneláky, offers students an introduction into the history of the state-socialist era high-rises that serve as housing for almost 40 percent of the Czech capital’s population today. Scholars have studied paneláky in an interdisciplinary manner since the fall of communism in Central-East Europe in late 1989: scholars from the humanities and social sciences have inquired into the particulars of the design and construction of Prague’s housing estates during the Cold War, their ideological and socio-cultural impacts, and the entwined urban and political negotiations of their tenants and the state.This class will introduce the students to historical events and theoretical concepts surrounding the state-socialist housing estates. They will become familiarized with authors from architectural and urban history, sociology, urban geography, and anthropology. The class will focus on the current state and problematic of paneláky and the details of their architectural, urban, and societal significance during the existence of the Czechoslovak state. This class is aimed at interested undergraduate students from all departments in social sciences and humanities regardless of their academic year. The class will be taught only in English.

Human Rights in Central and Eastern Europe

Code: YBAU28 Lecturer: Heřmanová,M. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.This course invites students from all disciplines to explore and make sense of the current human rights issues, cases and problems in the region.

Humor under the Iron Curtain: Jokes and Everyday Life under Totalitarianism

Code: YBAJ019 Lecturer: Marková,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course deals with the phenomenon of Soviet jokes (anecdotes) which were very popular during the existence of the Soviet Bloc. Jokes covered every aspect of daily life under socialism – the shortages, leisure, sport, propaganda of the media, ideology and many other aspects. They were told in each Soviet Bloc state as a Poland, Czechoslovakia, and others because they shared the same culture and live conditions of that period. The term “Communist jokes” could be more precisely described as anti-Communist or anti-Soviet jokes because this term better captures the sense of shared culture. There are many reason why Communist political jokes were very special. They had a unique homogeneity: the absolute monopoly of state power meant that any joke about any aspect of politics, the economy or media was a joke about Communism. Communism regime was inherently “funny” because of a unique combination of factors. The ineffectiveness of its theories, the mendacity of its propaganda and the ubiquity of censorship were all important. The cruelty of its methods interacted with the sense of humor of the people on whom it was imposed.The aim of the course is to introduce students to the reality of everyday life under the Soviet rule in the countries of the Soviet Bloc through Communist Jokes.

Chernobyl: A Philosophical Study

Code: YBAJ078 Lecturer: Marek,J.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Over the course of 12 weeks, we will together be developing an interpretation of the Chernobyl disaster against the backdrop of 20th and 21st century cultural and societal developments. Using philosophy as a tool and point of view, we will be attempting a "thick description" of the phenomenon, at first starting in the epicentre of the atomic power plant, and gradually working our way outward and enveloping more broader contexts in the radioactive shroud of the fallout. Please use the following link to join the MS Teams class: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3a82d51563f3774b0185123f614b488461%40thread.tacv2/conversations?groupId=c4a30d4b-95a1-416c-a8f5-f1d3933a54dd&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2

Iconology: Art-historical and Philosophical Aspects Of Reading The Cultural Phenomena

Code: YMSMK028PV Lecturer: Váša,O.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 5
What does Botticelli’s Venus have in common with the contemporary Instagram stars? How did the influential renaissance concept of “figura serpentinata” become a pornographic backbone of contemporary sexual imagery? How did Michelangelo’s infernal orgies survive into the present time, disguised as the images of destruction? While addressing these questions, the course will provide a practical introduction to iconology as it has been defined and practiced by Aby M. Warburg and Ernst Cassirer in the 1920s and 1930s. Concerning their mutually influenced methodology, the course will interpret the critical aspects of the “nameless science” by (and while) exposing and analyzing complicated genealogy of the specific spectrum of surprisingly interrelated images like selfies, underwear advertising, cloud imagery, abstract painting, war atrocities or hygiene-related illustrations.

Identity, culture and cultural misunderstanding in the Czech context

Code: YMN201 Lecturer: Moree,D.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Course DescriptionAlthough contemporary Czech society is still perceived as very homogenous, topics related to ethnicity, identity, culture and nationalism are nonetheless very vivid. There have been many changes in the ethnic structure of the country since 1918 and ethnic tensions became a strong force that have played an important role in all the changes that took place over the past twenty years. This course will analyze this force and explore the link between political, social and economic changes and intercultural issues from different perspectives. The aim of the course is threefold: an introduction to intercultural issues in the Czech context against a background of social, political and historical change; an introduction to the main topics related to intercultural issues; and a reflection on intercultural competencies.

Intercultural Philosophy I.

Code: YMFPR162 Lecturer: Sepp,H.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 4
Introduction to OikologyA profile of oikological thinking will be developed along the lines of five central thematic groups: 1. an introductory clarification of the concept and subject of oikological thinking and its method; 2. an analysis of the beginnings of oikological determinations in authors such as Heidegger, Levinas, G. Bachelard, Watsuji, and Fink; 3. an oikological investigation of the relationship between subject and object and thus of self realization of life and an objectifica-tion guided by theory; 4. an oikological detailed analysis using the example of the topics of measure, law, and right; and 5. a final assessment of the possible results of oikological think-ing.

Intercultural Philosophy II:

Code: YMFPR163 Lecturer: Sepp,H.
Semester: Spring Language: German
ECTS credits: 4
Interkulturelle Philosophie – Graeco-Buddhismus. Spätestens im Zuge der Ersten Globalisierung nach dem Indienfeldzug Alexanders rücken griechische und indische Kultur zusammen. Es soll gefragt werden, wie ein sich veränderndes Menschen- und Weltbild sich in philosophischen, aber auch künstlerischen Formen zum Ausdruck bringt. Im Zentrum stehen dabei die Entstehung der skeptischen Philosophie und Schulen des buddhistischen Denkens im Kontext der Kultur von Ghandara.

Introduction to 3-D Graphics

Code: YBK052 Lecturer: Říha,D.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Introduction to 3-D Graphics:This turorial-based course will allow students to learn the essentials in 3-D design with software Cinema 4D by Maxon.

Introduction to Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art

Code: YMFPR207 Lecturer: Carlson,S.
Semester: Fall Language: French
ECTS credits: 5
!Following the decision of the Head of the Deutsche und franzoesische Philosophie in Europa (EuroPhilosophie) study programme, this course will be taught online on Zoom during the winter semester of the 2021-22 academic year. The details will follow towards the beginning of the semester. Students who enroll in the course will get information about the link to the virtual classroom directly from the teacher or through a message in the SIS.!Ce cours se propose d’aborder la question de l’esthétique et de la philosophie de l’art a travers trois questions axiales. Il s’agira a chaque fois de convoquer, dans une lecture critique et croisée, des philosophes (mais aussi des artistes et de historiens de l’art) d’inspirations et d’époques différentes. Le premier axe concerne le traditionnel concept de mimesis, que nous aborderons dans son sens classique, chez Platon et Aristote, mais aussi dans une perspective critique et phénoménologique, notamment avec Derrida («?économimesis?») et Richir (et son concept de «?mimesis non spéculaire, active et du dedans?»). Le deuxieme axe concerne le jugement esthétique, avec son doublet conceptuel «?beau-sublime?», que nous étudierons a partir de Kant, mais aussi, partant, chez Heidegger, Lyotard, Deleuze, Derrida, Ranciere, etc. Le troisieme axe concerne la notion de forme, qui nous conduira a aborder également la question de l’image et du rythme en art, ainsi que la question du style (notamment avec Kant, Husserl, Maldiney et Didi-Huberman).

Introduction to Anthropology

Code: YBAJ001 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
In this introductory class to sociocultural anthropology, students will acquire a basic knowledge about the histories, theories and methods in sociocultural anthropology. Moreover, students will engage in critical understanding of many relevant anthropological concepts and issues, with a special emphasis on the following topics: cultural relativism, culture and difference, language and power; gender and culture; religion and culture; cross-cultural understanding of art; orientalism; cultural appropriation; social and historical construction of ethnicity, race, and nation/nationalism; anthropological perspectives on social class; anthropology of emotion; colonial and postcolonial cultures and economies; anthropology of global migration, and refugee discourse. Anthropological approaches of familiarization/defamiliarization (Rosaldo), and anti-essentialist concept of culture (Abu-Lughod), will provide for the main framework of analysis of various case studies employed during the course. Areas of study will include both Western and non-Western societies, historical and contemporary. Classes will combine lectures with participatory discussions based on film materials, and mandatory weekly readings. In addition, students will learn how to analyze, understand, and critique media images, sounds, and cultural and academic texts as related to the main topics of the course. Grading is based on participation, weekly reading and writing assignments, and a final exam.

Introduction to Civilization Studies - Reading

Code: YMH518 Lecturer: Kumsa,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The aim of this course is to elucidate the process of civilization and globalization as the widening, deepening, and speeding of worldwide interconnectedness in all aspects of social life, from economics to politics, finance, culture, and crime. Globalization is therefore also about connectivity. In this course we explain different theories of globalization, historical waves of development of globalization and various aspects of globalization processes.

Introduction to Economics

Code: YBAJ011 Lecturer: Čábelková,I.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is designed for students, who wish to learn basics of economic analysis.Syllabus1. Demand, supply and market price2. The price mechanism and market failure3. Some application of price theory4. The basis of demand5. The laws of returns6. Perfect competition, imperfect competition, monopoly, price discrimination7. National income and its measurement. Investments8. Aggregate demand and aggregate supply9. Money and the creation of bank deposits, monetary control10. Inflation, value of money11. Exchange rate systems12. Public finance and taxation13. Exam

Introduction to Christian Symbolism

Code: YBF303 Lecturer: Kružík,J.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The seminar introduces students to the problem of Christian symbols and symbolism; the general problem of symbol and religious symbolism will be dealt with during the analysis of phenomenology of some Christian symbols (as for example cross, nimbus, aureola; symbols of Trinity, Holy Ghost, Virgin Mary; common attributes given to angels, apostles and saints).

Introduction to Political Philosophy

Code: YBAJ014 Lecturer: Hanyš,M.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course provides students with a brief introduction into the Western politicalphilosophy through examining some of the major texts of both various classical authors suchas Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau and the modern (Mill, Weber, Arendt, Strauss, Rawls etc.).

Introduction to Psychology

Code: YBAJ010 Lecturer: Brumovská,T.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
Introduction to Psychology course is meant to be an introduction to psychology asa scientific discipline. It covers basic and essential knowledge from psychologydisciplines: developmental psychology, social psychology, health psychologyand psychology of personality.The lectures will be organised online in both live MS Teams sessions and in pre-recorded ppt commented presentations in MoodleLiterature:Gleitman, H., Gross, J., Reisberg, D.: Psychology. 8th Edition. W.W. Norton and Company Ltd. 2011.Assessment:Test

Introduction to Research Methods in Social Sciences

Code: YBA276 Lecturer: Brumovská,T. + Lindová,J.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Do you want to Try out qualitative research methods in the real world? Understand the differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods in Social Sciences? Learn how to conduct an interview? Understand the perception of the intimate space of other people?This introductory course is designed for students from 2nd to 4th semester, and it has three primary aims. 1. It aims to give students a grounding in the theoretical and practical application of research methods in the social sciences. 2. The course will prepare students for the methodological part of the Comprehensive Exam in Social Sciences (CESS). 3. Completing this course offers a first step towards the skills students need to design and conduct their own dissertation research.The course consists of 4 x 3 blocks of lectures. Lectures are organised in mixed teaching and learning, consisting of the live MS Teams online lecturing and pre/recorded ppt presentation available in Moodle before the Block begins.The lectures are complemented with practical small assessments, where basic features of qualitative and quantitative research are exercised. The final assessment will concern the research project's proposal in qual or quant research design (your choice) that students will submit by early May 2021 (Deadline TBC).

Introduction to Sociology

Code: YBAJ009 Lecturer: Černý,K.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
1. What is sociology? More than opinion polls. The object of sociology, place of sociology among other socialsciences, historical and epistemological roots of sociology, a plurality of sociological theories and methods(multi-paradigmatic character), sociology and common sense, sociological imagination.2. Culture, socialization, social roles. Gender. Sociology of family (traditional and modern family, selectedtheories) and demographic reproduction of the society (first and second demographic transition, aging, ThomasMalthus and his critics).3. Deviation and social control: anomie (Durkheim, Merton), social pathology, theories of suicide (Durkheimand his critics), corruption.4. Social stratification (casts, classes, etc.) and social mobility, inconsistent social status, the theory of elite.Sociology of city.5. Theories of social needs, interests, attitudes, and values (postmaterial values). Social groups (typology): smalland large, formal and informal, primary and secondary, reference and member; mobs and public.6. Sociology of education: inequalities and their social reproduction, hidden curricula, knowledge society theory,scenarios of schools for the future.7. Sociology of religion: secularization theory and its critics, Weber and Durkheim, the clash of civilizationsdebate (S. P. Huntington), contemporary religious terrorism (M. Juergensmeyer).8. Sociology of bureaucracy and social organizations: Weber, Merton, Crozier, and Goffman.9. Sociology of media: historical and social context, the influence of media, empirical evidence.10. Sociology of conflict and social change, reform and revolution, globalization and its consequences, socialmovements, democratization, global problems.11. Theoretical sociology: classical sociology (Marx, Durkheim, Weber) and modern sociology.12. The methodology of sociological research: Quantitative and qualitative (and examples).

Introduction to the Musics of the World

Code: YBA242 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
This course helps students learn about a variety of music cultures from around the world, and at the same time, enables them to understand and appreciate music as an integral part of particular socio-political and cultural contexts. In the class, we consider court, village, religious, and popular music cultures, both in their traditional and contemporary manifestations. Through the examination of particular case studies, we mainly focus on the music cultures of ten different areas and peoples from around the world: West Africa, South Africa, India, Egypt, Balkans, Indonesia, Japan, Andes, Mexico, and the Caribbean. We discuss these music cultures through the perspective of sound, setting, and significance, and comprehend them in relation to a variety of socio-political issues such as nationalism, transnationalism, post/colonialism, globalization, tourism, minorities, gender, religion, identity, cultural appropriation, exoticization, construction of authenticity, and resistance. Class discussions are based on short weekly reading and writing assignments, and on analysis of music and video examples. No preliminary requirements.Due to Covid-19 restrictions, the class will be offered in an online form, through this MS Teams link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/channel/19%3ad35bd450f8e6457da50fb0b80fc991b2%40thread.tacv2/General?groupId=6ff4a26f-e2c9-44a3-b3e5-68e28cc12eb9&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2

Introduction to the Philosophy of Music

Code: YMFPR206 Lecturer: Carlson,S.
Semester: Fall Language: French
ECTS credits: 5
!Following the decision of the Head of the Deutsche und franzoesische Philosophie in Europa (EuroPhilosophie) study programme, this course will be taught online on Zoom during the winter semester of the 2021-22 academic year. The details will follow towards the beginning of the semester. Students who enroll in the course will get information about the link to the virtual classroom directly from the teacher or through a message in the SIS.!Ce cours propose une introduction générale a la philosophie de la musique. Qu’est-ce que la musique?? Comment se constitue le phénomene proprement musical?? Comment l’analyser philosophiquement?? Telles sont les questions générales auxquelles ce cours tâchera de répondre, en sollicitant les rares (mais précieux) textes philosophiques concernant la musique, complétés par quelques textes de compositeurs et de théoriciens de la musique (Berlioz, Wagner, Schönberg, Nono, Messiaen, Boulez, etc.). Trois axes scanderont le parcours : 1° Musique et langage. 2° L’institution du temps musical : rythme et forme. 3° Dissonance et consonance.Il n’est pas nécessaire d’etre musicien pour suivre ce cours : l’utilisation du vocabulaire technique musical sera réduite afin que tout participant qui n’est pas formé a la langue et l’écriture musicale puisse suivre aisément. Outre la lecture des textes, l’écoute d’ouvres musicales sera privilégiée comme support a l’analyse philosophique.

Introduction to the Politics of Climate Change

Code: YBAJ076 Lecturer: Kalenda,F.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
This module aims to present the current change of climate not only as scientific but also as a political issue that’s been subject of increasingly heated debates outside the academic circles. Participants will gain a basic understanding of the way humans cause climate change and of its overall impacts, but the main focus lies in providing them with the historical context of the discussion among scientists and politicians, policy steps taken on different levels of government and role of various governmental and non-governmental actors.PRACTICAL INFORMATION: This module will be taught in person. However, this may change depending on the current covid situation. Classes will be also available in audio form for those who miss them for whatever reason.

Jewish Life in Contemporary Europe

Code: YBAC045 Lecturer: Fingerland,J. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8

Language Course: French Literature and Philosophy I.

Code: YBFC213 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: French
ECTS credits: 3
Cours de français (langue étrangere) destiné aux étudiants en philosophie désirant approfondir leur connaissance de la langue par la lecture, l'écriture et la discussion autour de la littérature et la philosophie. Niveau de langue exigé: B1, selon le "Cadre européen commun de référence pour les langues". Le texte étudié sera Le Regard du roi de Camara Laye. Le texte sera disponible sur SIS.

Language Course: French Literature and Philosophy I.

Code: YMFPR170 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: French
ECTS credits: 2
Cours de français (langue étrangere) destiné aux étudiants en philosophie désirant approfondir leur connaissance de la langue par la lecture, l'écriture et la discussion autour de la littérature et la philosophie. Niveau de langue exigé: B1, selon le "Cadre européen commun de référence pour les langues". Le texte étudié sera Le Regard du roi de Camara Laye. Le texte sera disponible sur SIS.

Language Course: French Philosophy and Literature II.

Code: YMFPR15 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Spring Language: French
ECTS credits: 2
Cours de français (langue étrangere) destiné aux étudiants en philosophie désirant approfondir leur connaissance de la langue par la lecture, l'écriture et la discussion autour de la littérature et la philosophie. Niveau de langue exigé: B1, selon le "Cadre européen commun de référence pour les langues".Le texte étudié est L’Invitée de Simone de Beauvoir. Le cours du premier semestre couvrait la premiere partie du roman. Celui de ce semestre couvrira la deuxieme partie. Il est conseillé aux étudiants de lire la premiere partie du roman (disponible sur SIS) avant la premiere séance du cours.

Methodology and Basic Concepts of Classical Phenomenology

Code: YMFPR151 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 8
Ziel des Kurses ist es, entlang des Begriffs der Natur einen Einblick in Konzepte der klassischen und gegenwärtigen Phänomenologie zu geben. Die ersten Sitzungen präsentieren eine Einführung in den Gegensatz des naturalistischen und personalistischen Zugangs zur Welt (E. Husserl, Ideen II) sowie Merleau-Pontys kritische Übernahme des Husserlschen Denkens auf dem Weg zu einer Ontologie des Sinnlichen (der Philosoph und sein Schatten). Wie Merleau-Ponty empfing auch Eugen Fink maßgebliche Impulse für seine Korrektur des von Husserl eingeschlagenen Kurses durch Martin Heidegger. Mit Fink betrachten wir in den folgenden Sitzungen das Projekt eines kosmologischen Überstiegs der Phänomenologie, indem wir dieses Projekt über den zentralen Begriff der Physis aufschließen. Neben der Teilnahme am Workshop „Phänomenologie und Ökologie“ sind die letzten Sitzungen der von Fink beeinflussten phänomenologischen Kosmologie Renaud Barbaras und dem Denken Jan Patočkas gewidmet.

Methodology of Historical Science

Code: YMH504 Lecturer: Marková,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The main goal of the course is to improve students' research and writing skills. The course introduces students to the historian's craft and acquaints them with the key principles of historical research. The main focus of the classes will be on the critique of sources (i.e. how should we read and interpret written primary and secondary sources, printed sources, literature etc.). We will study different theoretical and methodological approaches in history. Yet the attention will be focused on interrelated theoretical questions of historical research such as What is the relation between political power and history? How not to be fooled by propaganda? How reliable are dates and facts in history? Is a total historical reconstruction possible? Does an „objective historical truth“ exist? Can history and the historian be objective? The Methodology class is a creative lab where students will try to create and improve their own research project (such as a master thesis, future academic research, research proposal for a fellowships or scholarships etc.). Therefore, the main aim of the course is to improve students' ability to create a viable, coherent and well-formulated project proposal with clear objectives, methodological frame, and clear data (and/or sources) collection strategy.

Milestones of European historical development in historical and sociological context

Code: YMH549 Lecturer: Štemberk,J. + Marková,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The aim of the course is to shed light on the key milestones of European history framed within their broader historical, cultural, and sociological context. The main attention will be focused on explaining the continuity of European historical development as well as on the interpretation of the significant historical events such as revolutions, wars, societal and cultural transformations, religious conflicts etc. throughout the European history. The lectures will be organized around key problems and topics (e.g., Enlightenment and its ideas, national identity and nationalism etc., see syllabus), which will be analysed and interpreted. The main attention will be focused on the process of transformation (social, cultural, religious, change in collective and national identities and others) in traditional, modern, and post-modern societies throughout the history.

Modern History of the Jews in East Central Europe

Code: YBAC001 Lecturer: Bartáková,D. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.This course aims to explain the causes behind the respective governmental policies, highlight the profound changes taking place in Jewish community life during the era under scrutiny, illustrate the complexity of Jewish-Gentile relations and emphasize the importance of migration and demographic changes.

Music and Youth Cultures

Code: YBA315 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
This course investigates the notion of youth culture and its relation to music. It examines history and theory of youth cultures, and looks closely into particular case studies from around the world. Historically, the class covers early youth ‘subcultures’ such as 1960s countercultures (‘hippies’), mods, rockers, skinheads, punks, grunge youth, riot grrrls, and ravers. Case studies include subcultural and mainstream youth cultures from Great Britain and the US, African American youth cultures in the US, Asian and African diasporic youth cultures in Great Britain and France, and hip-hop, electronic dance music, heavy metal, and punk related youth cultures in Mexico, Brazil, East/Central Europe (before 1989), Caribbean Islands, West Africa, and the Middle East. Course discussions are framed around the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and nationality. Moreover, particular interest is directed toward social and cultural aspects that shape youth cultures, specifically media, technology, economy/capitalism, politics, and place. The whole class will be framed around the topic or resistance. We will also host a guest in our class who will talk about his experiences of making music and participating in local youth cultures in socialist Czechoslovakia. Class discussions will be based on weekly readings, music examples, and films. Students’ assignments will include brief weekly writing responses to the readings, and a final paper (topic: “complexities and contradictions of resistance”). No preliminary requirements.Due to Covid-19 restrictions, the class will be offered in an online form, through this MS Teams link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/channel/19%3a51c8723d02b1423888cfe39c12f8e34b%40thread.tacv2/General?groupId=f1f3c486-e0c4-4305-a533-091f1f714a12&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2

Music, Culture, and Technology

Code: YBAJ037 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Technology forms an immediate material basis of music culture, both in a sense of general technology (industrialization, mechanical and digital technologies), and music technology (music instruments, recording and music reproduction technologies). This class provides an insight into how historical technological changes affected music (its form, content, style), and its surrounding culture (listening modes, aesthetics, copy-right laws, social interaction, lifestyles), and vice versa. We start our journey with the pre-20th century music technologies (acoustic and mechanic music instrument technologies), and then spend most of the time with 20th and 21st century music technologies (electric and electronic music instruments and devices: gramophone, radio, tape, analog and digital music technologies). Class topics include: (1) an impact of the early recording formats and music technologies on the early-20th century reconfigurations in music, culture, and society, (2) relationship between music technology (recording formats, electric and electronic instruments, studio production) and music genres (especially jazz, rock, electronic dance cultures, and avant-garde music), (3) music-related technology as social power (standardization, control of behavior, laws, cultural appropriation) vs freedom (democratization, empowerment), (4) race, class, gender and music technologies, (5) cultural associations (authenticity), prejudices, and fears as related to music technologies (e.g., technophobia), (6) the role of technological mediation at live music events, (7) relation between place/space and technology (acoustics, urban soundscapes), and (8) retro(-futuristic) technological music trends. We approach these topics from a variety of theoretical and disciplinary frameworks, including anthropology, ethnomusicology, sociology, cultural studies, media studies, sound studies, and critical theory. With an aid of assigned readings, listening examples, film viewings, and class debates, we look into a variety of case studies discussing particular music technologies and their musical and cultural effects, both in Western and non-Western societies. We also have two class excursions: (1) visit of Prague’s Synth library (http://www.zvukpraha.cz/synthlibraryprague/; feminist approach to music technologies; demonstration of modular synth), (2) visit of Ankali club (https://anka.li/; presentation of nightclub technologies, and DJ technologies and techniques).

Neurobiology of Motivation

Code: YMPC006 Lecturer: Pfaus,J. + Martinec Nováková,L.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Náplní tohoto kurzu je výklad o neurálních mechanismech, které zprostředkují motivované chování. Kurz zahájíme četbou stěžejního titulu ("Motivational Systems" od Fredericka Toatese), čímž se seznámíme s koncepty jako např. cílesměrné chování a incentivní motivace, a mentálními zkratkami (heuristikami), jak se chování dá rozložit na motivačně rozličné složky. Porovnáme vliv podnětů vnějšího světa a vliv našich vnitřních stavů a podíváme se na to, jaký je mezi nimi vztah, a nahlédneme, jak tyto koncepty přispívají k našemu porozumění biologickým základům motivace. Poté se budeme věnovat neuroanatomii a neurochemii chování zaměřených na udržení fyzické homeostázy (příjem tekutin a potravy, regulace teploty, biologické rytmy...) a na dopady podnětů nebo stavů, kdy v těchto systémech dochází ke změnám. Následně budou diskutována chování "nehomeostatická", jako např. sex, rodičovské chování, agrese, a to, jak se tato chování řídí velmi podobnými neurochemickými zákonitostmi. Posléze se zamyslíme nad tím, jak tyto "přirozené" příklady motivovaného chování souvisejí s potěšením, odměnou a drogovými závislostmi. Předmět je celý vyučován v anglickém jazyce (přednášející - Prof. Pfaus - hovoří pouze anglicky).

Oral history perspectives on Cold War 1945-1989

Code: YBAJ048 Lecturer: Wohlmuth,P.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
This course aims to provide an introduction to oral history using the historical phenomena of the Cold War with special emphasis at ex-communist countries such as Czechoslovakia, Eastern Germany, Soviet Union, and China and also actors of Western leftist groupings. Most histories emphasize major political events or structures of economic development. Professor Donald A. Ritchie, the author of the influential book Doing Oral History, once explained the core of the discipline in these telling words: we do not do oral history to confirm what we already know, but rather to question what we consider to be supposedly clear. So, our main goal will be entirely different from the usual perspectives on Cold War: we will avoid major narratives and attempt to understand the structures and meaning of the historical subjectivity of so-called „ordinary people“, living under these oppressive regimes. How was life beyond the Iron Curtain for them? In which terms they had conceptualized their life experience? How did they relate to people, ideas, and material objects from the West? Oral history understands „ordinary people“ to be much more than just „onlookers“ to the actions of major historical actors.

Phenomenological Anthropology

Code: YMFPR190 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Spring Language: French
ECTS credits: 5
La nature, peut-elle avoir un visage au sens levinassien ? La rencontre avec la transcendance de la nature, peut-elle nous mettre, elle aussi, en question et déboucher sur une approche éthique vis-a-vis de la nature ? Pour répondre a ces questions, le cours de l’anthropologie phénoménologique se focalisera sur le rapport de l’homme et de la nature dans la phénoménologie française. Il aura son point de départ obligatoire dans la théorie de la Lebenswelt de Husserl et, en passant par Merleau-Ponty et Levinas, il abordera l’ouvre des auteurs strictement contemporains comme Maldiney, Richir ou Barbaras.

Phenomenology and Marxism

Code: YMFPR208 Lecturer: Bierhanzl,J.
Semester: Fall Language: French
ECTS credits: 5
Nous allons renouer dans ce séminaire avec le dialogue entre phénoménologie et marxisme, tel qu´il a eu lieu notamment dans les années 1950, 1960 et 1970 en France. Comment articuler la subjectivité avec ses déterminations sociales? Comment les phénoménologues ont-ils affronté les problemes d´histoire et de politique? Une synthese entre phénoménologie et marxisme est-elle possible? Voici certaines questions que nous allons nous poser dans ce séminaire.

Philosophical Anthropology

Code: YMFPR154 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Spring Language: German
ECTS credits: 8
Der Kurs ist der Entstehung und Entwicklung der modernen Philosophischen Anthropologie gewidmet. Die Philosophische Anthropologie wird dabei als „Dialog“ der klassischen Philosophie mit den empirischen Wissenschaften thematisiert.

Philosophy of Art

Code: YMFPR157 Lecturer: Sepp,H.
Semester: Spring Language: German
ECTS credits: 6
Tragödienstoffe der griechischen Antike wurden vor allem im Kontext der deutschen (z. B. Hegel, Nietzsche) und der französischen Philosophie (z. B. Ricoeur) immer wieder zum Gegenstand philosophischer Interpretationen. Demgegenüber soll hier versucht werden, den philosophischen Gehalt, der ausgewählten Dramentexte selbst inhärent ist, herauszupräparieren. Insbesondere soll anhand der Ausbildung spezifisch europäischer Rationalitätsauffassungen im Kontext einer beginnenden Logik und Dialektik untersucht werden, welchen Beitrag die Tragödie hierzu leistet.

Plato and Aristotle on Love and Friendship

Code: YBF348 Lecturer: Synek,S.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
This course provides a basic insight into classical topics of love and friendship depicted famously by Plato in dialogues Phaedrus, Symposion and Lysis, and by Aristotle in his Nicomachean Ethics.

Plato’s Republic

Code: YBAJ159 Lecturer: Synek,S.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Reading and commenting of one of the essential and most influential dialogues of Plato, that exposes his ontological, anthropological, ethical and political views in an astonishing complexity and unity.

Political and Cultural History of East Central Europe in the 20th Century

Code: YBAC032 Lecturer: Bouška,T. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.

Postcolonial Studies in Gender Perspective

Code: YMGS616 Lecturer: Jiroutová Kynčlová,T.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
AnotaceKurz představuje disciplínu postkoloniálních studií jak v rámci literární vědy a kulturních studií, odkud vzešla, tak v rámci kritických analýz historických i soudobých mocenských struktur, sociálních norem a kulturních reprezentací, jakož i v kontextu tzv. globalizovaného světa a mezinárodních vztahů. Kurz zkoumá kulturní a společenské praxe vztahující se k diverzitě, diferenci a zjinačování z pozice centra a okraje, analyzuje koncepty objektivizace „druhé/ho“ a s využitím feministických teorií a genderu jako analytické kategorie kontrastuje universalismus a kulturní relativismus. Vedle paralel mezi postkoloniálním a dekoloniálním myšlením sleduje též svébytný přínos feminismu k diskutovaným teoriím.Tematické okruhy1. Kolonialismus, imperialismus a kapitalismus – reflexe základních pojmů a průnik s genderovými studii2. Koloniální mapa světa, stručné dějiny kolonizace3. Globalistické koncepce světového řádu4. Orientalismus5. Formy lokální modernity6. Nacionalismus a národní stát7. Hybridita, reprezentace minorit, migrace8. Feminismus a multikulturalismus9. Patriotismus, kosmopolitanismus, kulturní relativismus, universalismus10. Filosofická a sociální pojetí kritérií diskriminace11. Teorie hranice, kulturní identita jako „hraniční“, hybridní, nomádská, posthumanistická12. Dekoloniálním myšlení13. Postkolonialismus a epistemologie14. Praktická cvičení – postkoloniální/dekoloniální analýza kulturních artefaktů

Prague as Living History: Anatomy of a European Capital

Code: YBAU004 Lecturer: Skripnik,O. + Skladanová,N. + Havlištová,V.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive informationis available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.This course and accompanying excursions will introduce students to the history of the Czech Republic and its capital city, Prague, while also showing the development of its urban structure and main social functions.

Preparatory Seminar for Introduction to European History

Code: YBH335 Lecturer: Kalenda,F.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Upon completion of the course students will have an overview of European history from antiquity through the Middle Ages to modern history. Students will learn the importance of basic historical terms, such as the Reformation, the Lenten System, the Papal Schism and many others. The course will consist of thematic-oriented lectures and will be finished by a written test concentrated on important historical concepts. Completition of said course will help students with their preparation for following mandatory examination from European History. Thanks to this structure, the course will be designed primarily for students from non-European countries.PRACTICAL INFORMATION: This module will be taught in person. However, this may change depending on the current covid situation. Classes will be also available in audio form for those who miss them for whatever reason.

Procedures and Methods of Historical Research

Code: YMH539 Lecturer: Štemberk,J. + Marková,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The main aim of the course Procedures and Methods of Historical Research is to get practical knowledge on how to create and formulate the research topic, how to formulate the goals, hypothesis and objectives of the research, and how to find, process, and interpret relevant sources (secondary literature, printed sources, archive sources, etc.). In other words, the main aim of the course is to create a strong and solid methodological frame for the future student’s future research, especially within the master thesis, as well as to improve the student's writing and research skills. Besides improving practical academic skills, we will study different theoretical and methodological approaches in history. The attention Attention will be focusedbe given to on interrelated theoretical questions of historical research such as What is the relation between political power and history? How reliable are dates and facts in history? Is a total historical reconstruction of a historical event possible? Does an „objective historical truth”“ exist? Can history and the historian be objective? How could we interpret the history?

Quantitative Data Analysis I.

Code: YMH515 Lecturer: Jirkovská,B.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The course covers the basic analysis of quantitative data from social surveys. Topics include basic knowledge about of quantitative research, simple descriptive statistics (central tendency and dispersion, frequency distributions), and elementary data manipulation; other topics are normal distribution and, transformation of variables. The Ffocus is on conceptual understanding and practical knowledge. Students will gain experience practicing their learning through various assignments using the statistical software SPSS. Students will learn how to (a) create datasets (e.g. from their own survey) and assess the type and quality of data and potential problems (missing values, polarized responses, outliers, etc.) and transform variables (recoding); (b) use basic descriptive and explorative statistical methods to answer a simple research question, assess the validity of simple hypotheses and graphically present the results; (cd) control the basic functions in the statistical software SPSS, e.g. elementary data transformation, descriptive statistics, and simple graphs. Final credit will be fulfilled with own simple data analysis.

Race and Gender

Code: YMGS631 Lecturer: Lorenz - Meyer,D.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course introduces students to critical studies of race, racism and racial politics, their rich genealogies in feminist theory and activism, and their continued urgency, particularly in Europe. What exactly does it mean to say that race is ‘socially constructed’ or that it needs to be ‘re-ontologised’? Is race 'fluid'? How do race and gender inevitably intersect in historically specific ways? What are apparatuses (including research methodologies) through which race gets reiteratively produced and made absent? And how are ‘we’ implicated in such racial productions? Through engaging case studies and feminist debates, the course examines the ruptures and continuities of racial formations, antisemitism, post/colonialisms, and racialized embodiments. The aim is to develop critical thinking, reading and research strategies for addressing processes of racialisation in a geopolitical context where the importance of race is routinely denied. We will also look at feminist and anti-racist organising, utopias, and debates about the limits of multiculturalism, and bio- and necropolitics.

(Re-)Building the Republic of Letters: Science in the Interwar Period

Code: YBAJ086 Lecturer: Hanyš,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
Once the World War I was over, scientists faced a novel situation. Once deemed the forefront of internationalism, science became the symbol of nationalism and destruction. While 1914-1918 scholars fought the war of their own. Now it was time to lower their guns and bury the hatchet.In the seminar we will look at processes of internationalization of science and scholarship in Central Europe in the Interwar Period. We will discuss various form of scientific internationalism and transnationalism present in Central Europe in the 1920’s and 1930’s, from one on the state level, through objects traversing national borders, to transnationalism experienced in scholarly centers. The seminar will be hold in English and will be strongly text-based. Topics: (The final list will be decided on the first two meetings taking the interests and language competences of participants into account.)1. Theorising internationality before the World War I2. World War I: Professors at War3. World War I: War of Declarations4. Science After Versailles: Loosing Lingua Franca5. Re-Connecting the World: The League of Nations6. Travelling Objects7. Prague I: Living Transationalism8. Crossing borders: Ukrainian scholarship between Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union9. Prague II: Loosing Transationalism10. Mobilising for the War

Reading in Historical Comparative Sociology

Code: YMH502 Lecturer: Německý,M. + Coman,A.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The seminar focuses on reading and discussing important historical sociological texts.

Reading Seminar in Phenomenology I.

Code: YMFPR172 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Fall Language: German
ECTS credits: 2
In diesem Seminar wollen wir uns mit dem sagenumwobenen Begriff der „Selbstverwirklichung“ befassen. Wir werden sowohl den etymologischen Ursprüngen, den diversen Begriffsintensionen sowie der historisch-empirischen Genese und schließlich dem kulturtheoretischen und gesellschaftspolitischen Status des Begriffs nachgehen. Dabei wird unser sozialphilosophischer Fokus auf dem Deutschen Idealismus sowie den ideen-geschichtlichen Ablegern und geisteswissenschaftlichen Resultaten der Hegelschen Philosophie liegen. Unsere im gemeinsamen Dialog erlangten Erkenntnisse werden wir kritisch in Beziehung zu folgenden Fragen setzen; erstens, ob Selbstverwirklichung durch allgemeine, anthropologische, gar ontologische Merkmalbe-stimmungen ausgezeichnet ist und damit einen transhistorischen und transkulturellen Status und Wert besitzt, oder rein soziokulturelles Produkt und historisches Phänomen ist; zweitens, ob und wenn ja, inwiefern der Begriff der Selbstverwirklichung sich von anderen Handlungstheorien unterscheidet und wie diese sich ggf. zueinander verhalten. Im Zuge dieser Auseinandersetzung werden vor allem die Begriffe „Arbeit“, „Angst“ und „Gesellschaft“ eine wichtige Rolle spielen und sollen ferner als zentrale Faktoren der Selbstverwirk-lichung be- und hinterfragt werden. Zum Abschluss werden wir uns darüber Gedanken machen, ob und wenn ja, wie und warum Selbstverwirklichung mit dem neuartigen Phänomen der Verpassungsangst/fomo kor-relieren könnte und wie dieses eventuell mit dem klassischen Begriff der „Entfremdung“ zusammenhängt

Science and Scientific Knowledge from the Perspective of Historical Sociology

Code: YMH5033 Lecturer: Voříšek,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The course introduces students to how historical sociology is analyzing modern science. Upon completing this course, the students will be informed about the basic historical transformations that science and scientific knowledge have undergone in modern society and will be able to identify and grasp the main analytical methods applied in social studies of science. The first part of the course focuses on key structural presuppositions of modern science: scientific disciplines, intellectual market, professions and bureaucracy as ways of organizing knowledge, and political ideologies. Second part focuses on the main methods used in analysis and critique of scientific knowledge: the approach of Michel Foucault, sociology of science, social constructionism, post-colonial and feminist studies of science. The course concludes by a discussion of contemporary society as a “knowledge-based society”.

Seminar in Social Psychology

Code: YBAJ073 Lecturer: Urban,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The Seminar in Social psychology aims to familiarize students with core texts in the field, develop academic skills and foster critical thinking of students in themes associated to social psychology. The Seminar will be organized around reading core academic texts in social psychology, watching related audiovisual materials, discussions and written assessments.

Seminar on Modernization and Modernization Processes

Code: YMH542 Lecturer: Voříšek,M.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
This seminar provides an insight into select theories of modernization. In parallel, it offers an overview of the process of modernization of European societies. It outlines the role that social sciences played in the process as both a reflexion and a normative guidance for social action. In the seminar, the Czech lands will serve as an example of interconnection between social sciences and modernization. Upon completing this course, the students will be have basic understanding of the changes that Czech society underwent in the 18th to 21st centuries. They will also have an idea about how Czech social scientists reflected and reacted to these changes. They will be able to connect this knowledge to the history of modernization of European societies, and contextualize it in the history of modern social sciences.

Sociological Data and Data Archives

Code: YMH519 Lecturer: Vávra,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The aim of this course is to introduce students to the techniques of quantitative and qualitative sociological data processing.

Sociological Theory

Code: YBAJ054 Lecturer: Wladyniak,L.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course is an introduction to the sociological theory and offers a closer analysis of the main sociological concepts (both classic and contemporary). In a form of a lecture, the course offers a comprehensive overview of the most influential theories and theoreticians. Individual lectures are devoted to particular issues in sociological theory. The course is recommended for the students, who already graduated from the course Introduction to Sociology.

Sociology of Development and Transformation

Code: YMH541 Lecturer: Kumsa,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The aim of the subject is to elucidate the politico- historical division of the contemporary world into industrial and developing societies. The main focus of the course is different models of modernization after World War II in which different theories emerged. The first part of the course discusses models of modernization theories, whereas the second part illustrates key problems of developing countries and different proposals for their solutions from various viewpoints of experts and local knowledge on each topic of the problems

Surveillance in Central and Eastern Europe: Social Control Methods Before and After Communism

Code: YBAU026 Lecturer: Grigar,E. + Skladanová,N. + Havlištová,V.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.The class dialogue will be focused on the analysis of historical rhetoric of surveillance and its wide range of tools used to gain social control and that of its individual members. We will focus on the comparative analysis of different methods of social control practice employed by select former communist states (mainly Czechoslovakia, Poland, and East Germany) during communism and after its fall. Therein this course will probe several issues emerging from different types of relationships between the latest technologies and our society, as they may be used by those in power to cultivate the culture of social control, fear, and empowerment.

Symbolical Figures of Czech History

Code: YBAJ020 Lecturer: Marková,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course deals with symbolical figures of the Czech history (e.g., St. Wenceslaus, Jan Žižka, Jan Hus and many others) and changes in the interpretation of their role throughout history. The attention will be focused on an interaction between ideology and history, history and historical myths, collective memory and historical consciousness. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with significant milestones and symbolical figures of the Czech history as well as to demonstrate the ambiguity of their interpretation due to different political and historical contexts.

20th Century Philosophy

Code: YMFPR153 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Spring Language: German
ECTS credits: 8
Schlüsseltexte der Kritischen Theorie Im Rahmen des Seminars sollen zentrale Texte der kritischen Theorie (Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas) gemeinsam gelesen und besprochen werden. Die Textauswahl wird zu Beginn des Semesters bekannt gegeben.

The Formation of the Nation within the Process of European Modernization

Code: YMH509 Lecturer: Marková,A.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The aim of the course is to explain the process of state- and nation-formation in modern and contemporary European history. These processes will be discussed in the context of social, political, economic, and cultural transformation of Europe which took place from 17th till 20th century. In addition to that the attention will be focused on the processes of the construction of national identity as well as on the special case of Soviet state- and nation-formation.

The Habsburg Monarchy 1848-1918. Minorities, Nationalism, and Ethnic politics

Code: YBAJ155 Lecturer: Vondráček,J.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The Habsburg monarchy was a multi-ethnic empire and Europe’s second largest state. In spite of strong tensions between ethnic groups, it did not collapse until its military defeat in 1918.We will take a closer look at ethnic conflicts in the Czech lands between Czechs, Germans und Jews and examine the solutions pursued to solve these tensions in the age of nationalism, industrialization and bureaucratization. We will focus on the different nationalist movements, at the same time analyzing anti-Semitism and the roots of the Nazi movement in the Czech border regions. The seminar will be strongly text-based. You will be asked to read one to two texts and answer in-depth questions at each session.vondracek@mua.cas.cz

The Power of Cultural Representation

Code: YMA375 Lecturer: Verbuč,D.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 5
Representation, as a form of verbal and non-verbal communication, is at the core of what constitutes culture (cf. Stuart Hall), which is why it is also of a central concern to cultural and social anthropologists. Moreover, representation not only ‘communicates’ information, but also affects thought and action and creates reality (cf. Hall, Boroditsky), or if stated in the language of the performative, it can ‘do’ things (cf. Austin): it can affect minds and bodies of individuals, as well as shape public opinion, political decisions, laws, social hierarchies, and discriminatory practices. Students have an opportunity in this BA/MA course to study various theories of representation, as well as to engage in a practical analysis and deconstruction of diverse representational discourses as related to representations of race/class/gender/sexuality/nationality/ideology in film, media, news, music video, music performance, art, science, museums, political rituals, sports, and ethnography. Students are expected to engage in weekly reading and writing assignments, participate in class discussions, prepare one in-class presentation related to their research interests, and submit a seminar paper at the end of the course. We will also visit one museum/exhibition together (if there will be no Covid-19 restrictions). Due to Covid-19 restrictions, the class will be offered in an online form, through this MS Teams link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/channel/19%3af2aabdb942224b5aa085e76f7673e3f1%40thread.tacv2/General?groupId=7d6ce0ca-cc2f-48a8-8abf-7831ec0ce510&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2

The Quotidian from the Perspective of Historical Social Sciences

Code: YMH513 Lecturer: Šalanda,B. + Brown,L.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
In short, this course examines everyday life through various theoretical approaches, mainly in perspective of historical social sciences and anthropology. This topic incorporates several key themes; the everyday context of symbolic interaction and dramaturgy, places, non-verbal communication, fashion, consumption, things and violence. We will also study how social identities are formed and maintained. With the help of some major authors, we will begin to study the form and content of “everydayness” and where it sits within sociological scholarship.

Theatre of the Oppressed and Educational Activities in Civil Society

Code: YMN140 Lecturer: Moree,D.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 8
This module will further develop some activities already started by the Faculty of Humanities (at Charles University), by placing them in an international context and bringing them closer to citizenship education in schools. We will make use of the concept of the 'theatre of the oppressed' (Boalo, 1992), as well as previous research from the field of education and transformation of society after the fall of communism (Moree, 2008, 2013). We will elaborate them further in the directions mentioned below.In particular, the course will reflect on citizenship education in the light of societal changes over the last twenty years. We will focus on several aspects of this topic:1) We will analyze the extent to which education and civil society is linked to the societal context with a special focus on the transformation from communism to a more open system. An important aspect of this part of the module will be the co-operation between civil society and schools (Kymlicka, 2001; Parker, 2007). 2) We will analyze particular cases where civil society and NGOs help schools with citizenship education. We will analyze concrete examples of several projects or disciplines like multicultural education, history and citizenship education, school parliaments, etc. This part of the course will be based on an interdisciplinary approach (Anthias, 2011; Banks, 2004; Moree, 2008; Osler & Starkey, 2010).3) We will analyze empowerment and oppression as part of citizenship education. The 'theatre of the oppressed' will be the main method of this part of the module.From a practical perspective, we will combine several teaching and learning methods in this module. Literature analyses and presentations will be combined with interactive learning, dialogical learning, field visits and reflections.We will cooperate with a wide range of schools and civil society organizations in the Czech Republic, viz. Network of Inclusive Schools, Slovo 21, Antikomplex, Centre for Citizenship Education and ARA ART. Students will produce a final paper where they will choose to elaborate and reflect on one of their experiences from the field (excursion or theatre of the oppressed) in the light of theories which they studied in the first (theoretical) part of the module.Results of module development will be replicated at a national conference where people from NGOs, schools and the academic sector will work together.

Theory of Social Change

Code: YMH544 Lecturer: Šubrt,J. + Německý,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
The aim of this subject is to familiarize students with the basic issues linked to the topic of social change. Social change may relate to demographic processes, social structures, cultural patterns, societies and their subsystems, organizations, institutions or groups. They may have different scopes (total - partial), severity and depth (deep - surface level), durations (long - short term) and speed (fast - slow). The problem of social change is explained through theories aimed at describing change in a theoretical way as well as explaining it. The theoretical descriptions on which the class is based primarily focus upon the nature of the expression and direction of change (replacing what with what; what increases or decreases? Is it linear, cyclic or jumping?). Explanations focus primarily on issues such as: what are the sources of dynamism and innovation? What are the agents of change and what factors influence its course?

Towards a Philosophy of Existence

Code: YBF349 Lecturer: Marek,J.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 4
The course is intended as an introduction into the German variety of existential philosophy (Existenzphilosophie). We will be discussing the philosophical work of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Jaspers, Heidegger, and Patočka. Our goal is to understand the basic scope, topics, and bearings of this particular variety of philosophy. The course is open to all interested students and requires no prior philosophical knowledge.

Travelling in the Middle Ages

Code: YBA337 Lecturer: Suchý,M.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The course provides students with insights into different aspects of medieval travelling. Source criticism to contemporary sources (chronicles, travel accounts, itineraries, books of travels, charters, etc.) within major topics (such as war campaigns, pilgrimage, university peregrination, diplomacy, trade and crafts) constitutes an important feature of the course.

Urban Anthropology of Central European Cities

Code: YBAU018 Lecturer: Zahradníková Štefánková,L. + Havlištová,V. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This is one of the UPCES courses (the Undergraduate Program in Central European Studies); comprehensive information is available at: http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#2.Central European cities have been undergoing rapid social and economic change, which has had major effects on their physical make-ups. It has also affected the ways in which people - urbanites as well as non-urbanites - perceive these cities and urban life in general. This course aims to investigate how, in the post-communist context, city dwellers perceive, define and use this rapidly transforming urban space, as well as how they try to shape and appropriate it.

Virtues, Vices, and Formation of Society

Code: YBAJ036 Lecturer: Kunca,T.
Semester: Fall + spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
Course should be taught online via MS Teams from 6 October 2020: Tuesday 15:30 - 16:50, link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/channel/19%3a40c5f99f3fc34026b075dfdd737e7836%40thread.tacv2/Obecn%25C3%25A9?groupId=01a59a2f-1022-408b-852b-4834ad7d1e26&tenantId=e09276da-f934-4086-bf08-8816a20414a2 Are the good, amiable qualities of man, virtues, or the bad, hateful ones, vices, the true foundation of human sociability, and consequent formation of society towards its civil and commercial stage? Dilemma famously exposed by Mandeville and still acute not only thanks to his disturbing arguments which are quite frequently misunderstood. What Mandeville really said, what was the main set of arguments proposed by his antagonists, what is say anthropological background of the debate? This kind of questions is to be posed and discussed when reading a selection of primary sources, state-of-art interpretations and even confronting these with observations of present social sciences.Students are expected to submit a 2000 words final academic essay. The word count should include all footnotes, endnotes, and quotations but should exclude the bibliography. Please include the word count on the title page of your coursework. Moreover, students are free to make a choice to write an essay on topics discussed and inspired by seminar programme or write an independent essay. Distance learning 2020 ( in COVID era): Seminar will be held in time scheduled (Tuesday, 15:30 - 16:50) via TEAMS class (link will be provided here by the first session) and students working on an independent essay or preferring individual tutorials may attend an online one-to-one tutorial or see me in my Troja office (2.22), if it would be allowed. Details will be published here by 5 October 2020.

Visual methods in historical sociology

Code: YMH550 Lecturer: Šubrt,J.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 2
The course is outlined as a block of theoretical lectures and practical exercises. The aim is to learn about various approaches to visual data material (Aumont 1990, Vvan Leeuwen 2005, Goffman 1976). The course entails extensively photography and film from the historical sociology view, though, at the same time, does not disregard further visual analysis fields – such as public space (e.g. museum exhibitions) or theater. The practical part is then based on the analysis and discussion of concrete studies – examples of the research use of visual methods. Along with that students collects their his/her own visual data material for the purposes of a small preliminary-research.

Visual Sociology

Code: YBAJ351 Lecturer: Wladyniak,L.
Semester: Spring Language: English
ECTS credits: 3
The course is an introduction to visual sociology and visual research methods. It provides students with the basics of visual sociology and visual studies, both in theory and practice. Its aim is also to give students an opportunity to explore the field themselves and gain some practice in working with visual material in social sciences. The course is completed by in-class workshops, students’ own projects and outside classroom activities.In the summer term 2021 the course will take place online (weekly meetings through MS Teams).

What is Society? Anthropology, Philosophy, and Sociology

Code: YMFPR205 Lecturer: Novotný,K.
Semester: Spring Language: French
ECTS credits: 5
Conçu comme un atelier de lecture, ce cours a pour but d’offrir une introduction a la philosophie et théorie sociales du XXe siecle. Pendant le semestre, nos discussions porteront sur les approches théoriques de Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, Marcel Mauss, W. E. B. Du Bois, Sigmund Freud, Max Horkheimer, Simone de Beauvoir, Michel Foucault, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Pierre Clastres et Clifford Geertz.

World Financial Institutions and Markets

Code: YBAC011 Lecturer: Evan,T. + Skladanová,N.
Semester: Fall Language: English
ECTS credits: 6
This course is organized by the partner institution CET Academic Programs (Central European Studies and Jewish Studies); comprehensive information is available at http://fhs.cuni.cz/FHSENG-350.html#8.This course introduces the basics of the evolution of financial institutions and markets around the world. The course uses both economic and political lenses to contextualize the state of financial institutions and markets against a background of 20th-century political development and history, and the current state of major world economic centers. The course examines main economic issues related to finance, markets, and macroeconomic policies during the second wave globalization post-WWII.


Last update: 28 Oct 2021

Co-funded by Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union
Last change: May 19, 2004 16:46 
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